Nomeculture Question

Discussion in 'Plants: Nomenclature and Taxonomy' started by lhuget, Jan 4, 2008.

  1. lhuget

    lhuget Active Member

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    I'm not sure if this is the right place for this but I'm moving a forsythia x intermedia "Minigold Fiesta" and I noticed that internationally the "x" is used only 50% of the time now. Is this a hybrid or not?

    Les
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Yes, F. x intermedia is always a hybrid.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2008
  3. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    My limited understanding of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature is that a small multiplication sign "x" used between genus and specific epithet names simply indicates that the plant is an interspecific hybrid origin - i.e. hybrid between two species within the same genus. An intergeneric hybrid is written with a large multiplication sign "X" before the genus name (Example: X Cupressocyparis leylandii). However, integeneric name may be derived from the generic names of the parents - a nothogeneric name - Amarcrinum Coutts for Amaryllis L. Crinum L.

    In the case of Forsythia x intemedia, the cross is F. suspensa x F. viridissima - i.e., it is a hybrid.

    Hybrids that arise from cultivated varieties within a species do not have the "x" designation, I do believe.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Yes, it's a multiplication sign not exactly like an "x", the latter being used to fudge it where the multiplication sign is not available or convenient. In some publications the multiplication sign is so big it could be approximated equally by either an "X" or an "x". However, Wikipedia at least does say an "x" is supposed to be used where the multiplication sign is not available.
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    To get the multiplication sign: Alt+0215 = ×
    (i.e., hold down the Alt key and type 0215 on the right-hand number keypad at the same time)
     
  6. Harri Harmaja

    Harri Harmaja Active Member 10 Years

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  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi Harri,

    Not any more; the new 2005 Vienna edition of the ICBN spaces it away from the epithet, and comments ( http://ibot.sav.sk/icbn/frameset/0071AppendixINoHa003.htm ):
    Readability is not at all well served by having the × hard up against the epithet, as it is too easily confusable with an 'x' in many fonts (consider e.g. Rosa xanthina, and the hypothetical hybrid Rosa × anthina / Rosa ×anthina, which can very easily be confused if the × is hard up against the epithet).
     
  8. alex66

    alex66 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    x= cross (or better crossed with), x (read like letter ) is one english abbr. ,international use ,ex. acer Davidii x Tegmentosum = Davidii cross Tegmentosum ;nuresery use "x " botanist use cross
     
  9. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Looks like I have a lot to learn still!

    But what's the original spirit of the question again?

    Is this a question about how nurseries are not very particular about adhering to accepted principles of botanical nomenclature?
     
  10. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yes. Far too many nurseries have an appallingly bad record when dealing with conventions of botanical nomenclature.
     

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