Identification: Newly Acquired Plant Needs Identified

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by epok147, Nov 4, 2004.

  1. epok147

    epok147 New Member

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    DENVER COLORADO
    just got this plant from a gift store the could not tell me the correct name for it. i would like to know what it is so i can care for it properly and get all of the potential pot of it; flowers seeds ....
     

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  2. plantluver

    plantluver Member

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    It looks like some type of philodendron or maybe diffenbachia? I'm sure it's tropical a anyway.
     
  3. Marn

    Marn Active Member 10 Years

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    HI There could this be it .. take a look at the link .. i beleive it is one of these sp ...
    http://www.flowers.org.uk/plants/plantfacts/anthurium.htm

    I know for a fact it is not a Dieffenbachia (Dumbcane) .. or a philodendron .. although the leaves look like the Philodendran cordatum - syn scandens, oxycardium (Heart leaf philly) .. but the base of them do not grow like that at all .. and they are not one you can bonsai .. and this plant looks like it has been growing as a bonsai

    hope this helps you in some direction for your plant ..
    good luck

    Marn
     
  4. Puddleton

    Puddleton Active Member 10 Years

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    it lookls to me as a species of Alocasia or common name cunjevoi
     
  5. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    I realize this thread is old but I was doing some research and discovered the indication that Philodendron scandens oxycardium is said to by a synonym for Philodendron cordatum. Scientifically there is no indication in any published document this is true and it appears to be only a horticultural myth. I've corresponded a great deal with Brazilian aroid botanist Marcus Nadruz who is the director of the Rio de Janeiro Botanical Garden and the two species are not related and don't even look alike. Philodendron cordatum is a unique species found along the coast in the region of Rio. The common name for Philodendron cordatum is Angra dos Reis. You can see botanically verified photos of Philodendron cordatum at this link:

    http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Phil...atum pc.html
     
  6. Lila Pereszke

    Lila Pereszke Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Alocasia cucullata...
    Edit: (Oops... November 4th, 2004?!? What an ancient old thread... :)
     
  7. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Correct, the species in the photos appears to be Alocasia cucullata. My only point was to clear up the fact this isn't Philodendron cordatum and that name is not a synonym in any scientific journal for Philodendron scanders or Philodendron oxycardium.

    Alocasia cucullata itself is a bit of a mystery and aroid botanist Peter Boyce in Malaysia believes A. cucullata is a very old hybrid created by monks. In a personal email Pete said the following, "Alocasia cucullata is widespread in SE China (Yunnan, Guagxi, Guangdong), N Vietnam, Laos, N. Thailand. It is never found away from human disturbance and is most often encountered as a planting around temples where is is meant to bring good luck. It is very possible that it is a stabilized cultigen of Alocasia odora selected for 'magical' properties by animistic hill tribes and now much planted to protect Buddhist temples."

    Although common in Central and South America Alocasia cucullata is not found there as a natural species. It has been imported. It also appears, based on Peter's research and observations, the species is likely a cultivar (hybrid) and does not occur naturally even in its natural range. This little Alocasia was likely created by man and as a result would be variable. Alocasia species are known to be highly variable and not every leaf of every specimen will always appear the same.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2009

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