New lawn dead after winter?

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Marquis77, Apr 15, 2019.

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  1. Marquis77

    Marquis77 New Member

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    Hi,

    For the second year in a row, the areas I had reseeded did not survive winter. Why? I reseeded in early September both years. The lawn seemed well established and healthy at the end of October.

    I live in Ottawa and bought my seeds (Kentucky Bluegrass and other mix) from Walmart.

    What am I doing wrong? Why isn't my new lawn surviving winter??

    Thanks a millions for your help
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    What was the pattern of snowfall / snow melt / exposed ground over the winter?
     
  3. Marquis77

    Marquis77 New Member

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    Lots of snow this winter (Ottawa), so no exposed grass. Normal melt. Because the "older" grass is unaffected, there's gotta to be another reason why, for a second year in a row, the new grass fails to survive winter (the lawn was lush and seemed to be doing fine in October!)

    Thanks a lot for your help!
     
  4. wcutler

    wcutler Esteemed Contributor Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    Maybe bugs in that area? Or ones that like the newer grass?
     
  5. Marquis77

    Marquis77 New Member

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    Thanks for your reply. Is there a way for me to know for sure? Or does it happen that grass from walmart doesn't survive winter (Kentucky bluegrass, creeping red fescue, annual ryegrass)?

    Frustrating :(
     
  6. Michigander

    Michigander Active Member

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    Go to a farm supply place, often called elevators here, and ask them for a mix that works. They will have a variety of proprietary mixes that are a little more expensive than big box, but it will work for you the first time. They supply the sod farms in your area, and know everything needed to know about your area.
     

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