Need help with pruning a climbing rose

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by Kristov, Mar 14, 2009.

  1. Kristov

    Kristov Member

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    Last year I planted two climbing roses (Eden/ Romanticas) they are in a teak container in a spot with plenty of sunlight (I’m in Brooklyn, NY). I had a couple of nice blooms at the beginning of the season, then nothing, but the plants grew a lot, more than 6 feet tall (attached to a trellis) and they looked very healthy. Now I can see them start burgeoning again and I think I will have to prune it. I'm totally new to this (and a bit nervous). Is it the right time now, or should i wait some more? Also I really don't know how much to cut off. I was hoping to keep the height, isolating the stronger stalks and cut all the thinner stalks. Any advice? What can I do to make sure to get more blooms this year, what plant food should I use?
    Thanks
     
  2. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    I must confess that I am not an expert on roses, but this I do know, a climber rose has a deep tap root, and if potted this is not favourable to the rose bushes' development and bloom (moisture retention,aeration,percolation, fertilization, so many factors..). You would need a sizeable pot (something so large and cumbersome to transport) to contain a climber, yet hope to see a reliable and continual annual abundance of blooms. Is it possible to plant your rose in the ground?
     
  3. Kristov

    Kristov Member

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    Thanks for your reply-I wish I could plant the rose in the ground but I don't have that option. The countainer is pretty large and the plant grew so well on the first year that I hoped it will survive and bloom this spring-will see...
     
  4. joclyn

    joclyn Rising Contributor

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    some roses will only bloom once per season and others will rebloom and those that rebloom will sometimes not bloom during the hottest part of the summer and will wait until the weather cools off a bit before putting on another decent showing. also, with some varieties, deadheading old blooms is needed to cause reblooming.

    i can't comment on growing them in containers as mine are right in the ground.
     
  5. Galiano Gardens

    Galiano Gardens Member

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    In my part of the world (pacific north west) Climbing roses are NOT pruned in the first two years except any dead diseased or dying growth, after the second year they are pruned in the fall after blooming. Leave the strong main shoots unpruned unless they are "out of bounds", just shorten the side shoots.

    Container grown roses require a little extra fertilization, An annuall top dressing will help. I would suggest visiting your local nursery and seeing what they recomend for an organic fertilizer available in your area. I like Alaska fish fertilizer.
    I hope this helps
     
  6. Kristov

    Kristov Member

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    thanks, very helpful! I really learn something. Make me feel much better if I don't have to prune this year!
     
  7. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Patience is needed with climbing roses. They don't do much in the first year or two in bloom production. It seems that they spend more of their reserves on developing their root system. By the third and subsequent years, the number of blooms will increase. But that also depends on the variety of rose. Eden gives a heavy spring flush, then takes a rest. By August, it's ready to produce a few more blooms. But it is a beautiful rose, and one of my favourites.

    By the sound of it, your rose is doing great - since it is throwing good length canes. It is these canes that are going to produce your flowers for the next few years. Don't prune them short unless you really have to. However, you may consider training them, tying them in directions where they stay out of the way of access. In particular, you may want to spend a bit of extra effort training the canes orientated as horizontally as possible. With some roses, Eden in particular, this is tricky - those canes are thick and rigid. Pulling them down too far can cause the canes to break or split away from the bud union. You can do this gently, a little bit every few days, and settle for a diagonal rather than a horizontal orientation. The further away from the vertical position the canes get, the more inclination it is to send out lateral growths. And it's these laterals which you provide flower buds.

    I prune in this order: 1. remove dead branches 2. remove damaged branches 3. remove diseased branches 4. remove old stems which did not produce much blooms the previous year 5. remove (or separate) crossing/touching canes.

    As for fertilising, since your rose is in a container, you will need to be a bit more cautious to not over apply granular fertilisers. The routine I use in the spring time for our containers is to apply bone meal and alfalfa meal, then slow release pelleted fertiliser (Osmocote or Smartcote). Once the main spring/summer blooming is over, I apply liquid fertiliser every other watering. How it will do in the long run depends on the size of your container. Eden is a relatively large rose, and needs more room at it's roots. Ideally, you should use containers or 7 gallons or large.
     
  8. Kristov

    Kristov Member

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    Thank you so much for your response. it is so detailed and carefully explained. I will follow your directions attentively. I pruned a little bit about a month ago, I added some fertilizer around the roots (Espoma, organic rose Tone). Now the branches are covered with lustrous foliage, they seems very healthy, but I'm not seeing any buds yet...(I go check every day..)
    Last year, when most of the growing occurred, i did train the canes to go horizontally, which did produce a lot of growth. My container is pretty big (16" x 27" 18'deep) hopefully it will provide my roses with sufficient resources. I was planning to add a liquid fertilizer once a week, and repeat the dry organic stuff once a month-do you think it's too much? Thanks again for your post!
     

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