Nana?

Discussion in 'Plants: Nomenclature and Taxonomy' started by globalist1789, Oct 15, 2006.

  1. globalist1789

    globalist1789 Active Member

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    Hi all,

    Simple question: What does "nana" imply about a plant when contained in the name? (eg. Juniperus Procumbens "nana"). I've seen it in a number of plant names, so it can't be specific to Junipers.

    Thanks folks.
     
  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    I believe it means dwarf.
     
  3. globalist1789

    globalist1789 Active Member

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    If so, then I'm guessing it would be either a hybrid or a sport that needs to be propagated vegetatively then?
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Typical species creeping (procumbent), so berries taken from 'Nana' can be expected to produce groundcover habit seedlings - should any come up. Don't know how easy this one is from seed.
     
  5. globalist1789

    globalist1789 Active Member

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    But they will vary in size? I'm not planning to do it, but I have some of these junipers at home. It was just that at the chinese gardens by my house they have 6 foot junipers that don't look very dwarf. They look just like the "nana" ones I have, but are a lot bigger than I would think a dwarf to be. So is it likely that they are Juniperus Procumbens, just not the "nana" variety?
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    No, it wouldn't be usual for Juniperus procumbens to be 6 ft. tall. They are probably another species, such as J. chinensis.
     
  7. Rima

    Rima Active Member

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    It always implies a small size version of a plant (or tree) from what I've seen over years. Those tall junipers may look like Procumbens nana, but must be something different ... 'Procumbens' is sort of a cross between 'prostrate' and 'recumbent', both of which mean low lying, and the 'Nana' part of the name just refers to size, not form or variety (Proc.).
     

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