Identification: My orange buddy is back

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by jodeecee, Oct 30, 2006.

  1. jodeecee

    jodeecee Member

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    This blob grows back each year, and is getting bigger. It starts out in late sept. or early oct. and is full size in about 10 days. it stays for 6 or 7 months. It is located in the pacific northwest, specifically southern oregon. Anyone know him/her?
     

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  2. allelopath

    allelopath Active Member 10 Years

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    Really small images. Can you post larger ones?
     
  3. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Many fungi that grow on trees like that are an indication of internal decay. do you know what kind of tree it is/was? that may help. Fromthe pic size I dont recognize it.
     
  4. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    That is from the Kindom Protista ... A slime mold, although I'm not sure of genus/species.
     
  5. jodeecee

    jodeecee Member

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    orange buddy

    I believe it's in an oak, it looks like it's healthy.
     

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  6. jodeecee

    jodeecee Member

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    orange buddy

    here's a better image
     

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  7. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Re: orange buddy

    I still say slime mold. If you poke it (with a stick) and a liquid oozes out, then you know have a slime mold.
     
  8. allelopath

    allelopath Active Member 10 Years

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    >>If you poke it (with a stick)
    Tried and true scientific method :)
     
  9. jodeecee

    jodeecee Member

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    I poked my orange buddy

    It isn't a slime mold! I used a stick to poke the orange fuzzy and the stick came out clean, and no goop came out. The fur slash fleshy fuzz is alot more intresting than i thought. The strands are about an inch long, fleshy, not slimy at all. The pictures i posted in my earlier thread were from last year, it has grown considerably. I will take another picture and try to show the fur better. This orange buddy is quite interesting. i was surprized to find the stick so clean, and i sort of felt bad for poking it. any idea on what it might be?
     
  10. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Let's see the new photos. Slime molds aren't necessarily slimy at all stages of their life.
     
  11. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Very interesting, hopefully we'll be able to get to the bottom of this.
     
  12. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    It could be something in the Phyllum Acrasiomycota, the cellular slime molds, as opposed to the priomoridial slime molds (Phyllum Myxomycota).

    Species in each of these Phylla have Mobile Feeding Stages (when you can poke them with a stick and they ooze) and a Stationary Reproductive Stage (when they are harder).
     
  13. jodeecee

    jodeecee Member

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    more on my orange buddy

    Thanks for all your replys by the way. here are the last photos of it. I'll poke it again to see if it oozes, when do you suppose is the right time? It sure doesn't seem like it'll ooze, but should i stand back? will it ooze alot? Thanx)
     

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    Last edited: Nov 28, 2006
  14. PhillyPalms

    PhillyPalms Active Member

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    Don't hurt it. The furry little creature is kinda cute.

    Your's is not what i expected. I get a bright orange mold/fungus, usually on my mulch, but it looks different then your pic.
     
  15. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    does it have teeth on the underside? these last pictures look like it might have this characteristic ...
     
  16. jodeecee

    jodeecee Member

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    :) I don't think it has teeth, not unless it keeps them hidden under the fur type shroom flesh.
     
  17. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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  18. jodeecee

    jodeecee Member

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    Wow, teeth indeed, trippy looking one there.
     
  19. bombita

    bombita Member

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  20. Harri Harmaja

    Harri Harmaja Active Member 10 Years

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    Possibly a fruit body belonging to the form genus Ptychogaster ("Fungi imperfecti") is concerned. In a few polypore species of the genus Oligoporus (aka Tyromyces aka Postia) (Basidiomycetes), the mycelium living in the wood at times fails to produce normal fertile fruit bodies with basidia and basidiospores. Instead the fruit body is either composed of hyphae throughout or it produces asexual spores, or conidia/chlamydospores which appear as internal brownish powdery mass.

    Cheers Harri Harmaja
    http://www.fmnh.helsinki.fi/users/harmaja/about_myself.htm
     

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