My Alocasia is weeping

Discussion in 'Indoor and Greenhouse Plants' started by marylou830, Aug 7, 2007.

  1. marylou830

    marylou830 Active Member

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    Why is my alocasia dripping water? I bought it in fair condition a few weeks ago and repotted it in loose, well-draining soil. Some of the large stems start to droop after a day or two, but I noticed one appeared to be rotting, so I have stopped watering it as often. I gave it about a cup daily, before that because of the drooping. I haven't watered it for 5 days, but the soil isn't totally dry. Any advise?
     
  2. edleigh7

    edleigh7 Well-Known Member

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    Sorry marylou I'm a bit confused. Is the plant itself weeping, what from the leaves, do you have a photo??

    Ed
     
  3. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Please post photos!!

    Alocasia species typically are rain forest species or grow on the edge of rain forest regions. My first reaction about dropping would be the plant is thirsty. I see it all the time. They almost can "talk" to you and tell you when they need water. But the "dripping water" is a concern. A photo might help us to understand what is happening.

    Also, do you know the species?
     
  4. marylou830

    marylou830 Active Member

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    Here are a few pics. As you can see, it's indoors, but it is near a window with open blinds. The temp in my house is usually 78 or 79. The leaves weep a clear liquid that looks and feels like water. Also, only one stem/branch is drooping, but I'm wondering if it does need water. I don't know the kind of alocasia they are, by the way.
     

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  5. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    I'm uncertain of the species but I'll ask a a couple of Alocasia experts to take a look. My guess is it is a hybrid. The plant appears healthy. I'd say it was most likely thirsty. The "tears" may be nothing more than humidity. Just keep the soil evenly moist.
     
  6. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Could it just be guttation? (disposing of excess water by squeezing it out of the leaves). Don't know if this is something that aroids do or not.
     
  7. edleigh7

    edleigh7 Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting....the problem i find with Alocasia is the wind because all of mine are in the garden...but yes I think more water...its pretty hard to overwater an Alocasia IMHO

    Michael F...guttation...never heard of it...please enlighten me at least...sounds interesting!!

    Ed
     
  8. LariAnn

    LariAnn Active Member

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    Just a quick note to answer your concerns:

    The "weeping" is guttation, which is a release or discharge of excess moisture when the plant has all it needs. The water exits through special pores called hydathodes. This is a normal process but does indicate that the plant does not need more water.

    The plant is Alocasia wentii.

    LariAnn
    Aroidia Research
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2007
  9. marylou830

    marylou830 Active Member

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    To everybody, thanks for the information; and I'm glad to know what species my alocasia is. So actually, it has enough water? I first thought that the bending/drooping leaf last week was from not enough water until I looked really closely and saw that the base of the stem and up about 8 inches was mushy and turning darker than the rest of the plant. I pulled it off because it was obviously not going to come back to life. That's when I decided to hold off on watering for a few days, but then a healthy-looking one started drooping. So I thought I'd better ask you guys for advise. I guess if it were outside in it's natural habitat, I would need to water daily, which is good info. to know, as well. I'll take all the information from the replies, and apply a little of each one of them.
     
  10. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    My thanks to LariAnn for explaining this. And as for your last question Marylou, I think if you reread what LariAnn wrote you'll find the "weeping" does not indicate the plant has more than enough water. Generally, Alocasia growers have learned the best thing to keep the plant happy is to keep them planted in well draining soil and keep the soil damp, not soggy. Some species can tolerate more water, but in most cases, just keep it damp.

    And to LariAnn and Michael, thanks again! I too learned something new today!
     
  11. marylou830

    marylou830 Active Member

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    I have it in a really large pot with a non-detachable saucer on the bottom. Should I just pour water in that saucer and always have some in the bottom? I'm not sure how to keep the soil moist without drowning the poor plant.
     
  12. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

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    Water in the saucer will help increase the humidity which will help. But there are two ways of checking the soil.

    A really easy way is to stick your finger in a couple of inches and see if it still feels damp. If it does, you may not need to water unless you see the leaves beginning to droop.

    You can go to any Lowe's or Home Depot and buy an inexpensive moisture meter. Just put it in the soil and it will tell you if the soil is wet, damp, or dry.
     

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