Moving an Acer - when is best to move

Discussion in 'Maples' started by buddend, Apr 22, 2007.

  1. buddend

    buddend Member

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    We have a Orange leafed Acer tree that we would like to move within our garden. This is a small tree and has just leafed but would like to move it as it is being over shadowed by a twisted willow tree. It is about 1 inch in thickness we have had it a year. When is a good time to move it? Please advise.
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Any time in winter when the tree is leafless, and the soil is not frozen.
     
  3. RJosefD

    RJosefD Member

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    From what Ive read....the Japanese Maple is this Acer right? I have a red leaf J. maple front of my house (previous owners) and is not in the right place, so I would like to plant it elsewhere. From the last reply I read it needs to be done in winter during no frozen ground. My question is (1)will I surely kill it if it is transplanted now in spring and (2)how far down and out do I need to dig to avoid root damage on a tree currently 7-8' tall?
     
  4. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Firstly you would be almost certain to kill this tree if you tried to move it now when it has just leafed out
    Secondly .. if this tree is 7-8 feet tall then it will have a sizeable root ball. I would suggest that you consider getting tree specialists to undertake the move. The weight would be considerable apart from anything else
    The cost, of course, would be considerable. Why not leave it alone?
     
  5. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    a one inch thick, 8 foot tall maple would likely be ok with a rootball about 18 to 24 inches in diameter and 12 to 16 inches deep. having it dug by a pro should give you better odds of survival, best time would be fall after leaf drop.
     
  6. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    I want to share my experience. It is not an advice since the conditions (i.e.: preparation, type of soil, approach, etc.) under which I do it may not be the same elsewhere.
    I move my maples which have been in the ground 3 years or less any time in the year, except when the ground is frozen on when under heat stress. I have never had any losses due to the moving. Otherwise I do it during Winter.

    Gomero
     
  7. bigjohn33

    bigjohn33 Active Member

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    hi,
    same thing for me
    like gomero, i moved a lot of acers during spring time or even summer time
    and i never lost a single maple
     
  8. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    hehehe
    I think we are talking about two different trees here
    I also have been able to move new trees at any time of the year. This is because they have not had time to establish their roots. However, it is important to give them as little stress as possible by having the new home pre dug and by moving so quickly with the transfer that the poor thing doesn't even know it has been moved
    Nevertheless the best time for moving a maple is when it is dormant .... usually late autumn is best here rather than early spring when it might be thinking about life again
    However .. the established tree at 8 feet tall I would probably leave alone
     
  9. buddend

    buddend Member

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    Thank you for your reply. The tree is only a few feet high but your are possibly right to do this more in the autumn than now as fully in leaf. Thank you again.
     
  10. RJosefD

    RJosefD Member

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    I appreciate the comments. I dont want to leave it where it stands because there is a short groomed hedge behind it and some other smaller permanent plants also behind the over powering maple and also overtaking the window view. So it sounds as though if I do move it to wait till its dormant (winter) then have the new "home" ready and take out about 2' deep by about 3'diameter... should do.
     
  11. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Why not prune off the lower branches and open up the area below and behind the tree?
     
  12. RJosefD

    RJosefD Member

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    whis4ey.... I have to smile at your persistence to keep it there. You must be a true advocate for the Acers around us, they have a good fighter on their side! I may keep it there but if not Ill take precautions in all the steps I take - THANKS!!!!!!
     
  13. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    RJosefD, Worth checking out that link below whis4eys name, beautiful and interesting garden, you will see where he's at.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2007
  14. Dale B.

    Dale B. Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    If you are planning the move, you can improve the chance of success by planning the size of the rootball that you will be taking this fall. Go ahead and dig part of the rootball now. You should mark the outline you plan to dig this fall and dig alternate sections about 12 to 18 inches long all around the tree. Dig one section and skip the next. All around the tree.

    What you are doing is root pruning the tree. Where you cut the existing roots, new fiberous roots will grow this year. When you cut the rest this fall, the tree will have a head start at producing new fiberous roots close to the rootball.

    Dale
     

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