Most Southerly Palm Trees in the world?

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by Deneb1978, Jul 14, 2009.

  1. Deneb1978

    Deneb1978 Active Member 10 Years

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    Hey all..

    I've created and read several threads about the most northern palm trees, but what about the most southerly ones? The most southerly Phoenix Canariensis could probably be grown or is already in Invercargill, NZ (46 degrees south) which is zone 9 (I've personally seen them growing in Melbourne, Australia at 37 degrees south but I'm sure they could be cultivated much further south than this). The most southerly Trachycarpus Fortunei could probably be grown or is already in Punta Arenas, Chile (53 degrees south - Zone 8). What are your thoughts?
     
  2. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I'd say they're likely in Chile; T. fortunei is most definitely in Punto Arenas.

    And while we're on palm-growing extremes, the highest-altitude ones are Parajubeas of Ecuador and Bolivia, both of which are found above 3,500 meters of elevation (11,400 feet give or take).
     
  3. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    "(I've personally seen them growing in Melbourne, Australia at 37 degrees south but I'm sure they could be cultivated much further south than this)."

    Ah yes they were the tree of fashion about 50 yrs ago. These days any that have to be removed are carefully dug up and re sold/planted in all sorts of places. Whole new housing estates suddenly support full grown palms. Below a couple of the locals.

    http://travel.webshots.com/photo/2878066720063512923YstYOa

    http://family.webshots.com/photo/2962880280063512923asGPCI

    Liz
     
  4. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  5. Deneb1978

    Deneb1978 Active Member 10 Years

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    Yeah Nikau is a beautiful palm...I did read that it's the southernmost native palm... but I think it's only hardy to zone 10 or zone 9 with protection.....
     
  6. Nath

    Nath Active Member

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    I have read somewhere that the Chinese Windmill Palm is one of the most cold/frost tolerant, feel free to correct me if I am wrong.
     
  7. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    That is correct and Chinese Windmill Palm is Trachycarpus fortunei, mentioned above as a likely candidate.
     
  8. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Some others are more cold tollerant, but regional climate plays a big part in that.
     
  9. Nath

    Nath Active Member

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    From personal experience with my own palms is that most of what I grow will toerate frost and cold, even my citrus trees, what they won't tolerate is too much damp and wet, so the soil needs to be really well drained and then cover the area in the wet season to avoid problems also have a good fungacide handy, which reminds me Lorax I managed to get hold of some of that treatment you told me about, so fingers crossed.

    Nath
     
  10. Ian

    Ian Active Member

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    So you're in Ecuador... have you seen Parajubaea cocoides cultivated above 11,000 feet there? I had always thought the palm altitude award went to P. torallyi var. microcarpa (wild plants) in Bolivia.
     
  11. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I have, actually - in the town of Papallacta, which is at 3520m, or 11,548.556 feet. I'm not sure if they're wild or cultivated, but they're definitely there.
     
  12. Ian

    Ian Active Member

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    That's very interesting. I read (following a link on the IPS website) that wild plants P. cocoides were discovered recently in a small area of northern Peru, but it was only known from cultivation for a long time. Hopefully you'll be able to view this.
    http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?showtopic=17323&hl=cocoides

    What's the highest altitude you've ever seen a Ceroxylon species?

    Another contender for highest cultivated palm might be Phoenix canariensis, which I have seen above 11,000' in Cusco.
     
  13. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    For P. canariensis, I've seen it above 11,000' in Quito, too, and on the Latacunga plains. Those are definitely cultivated, though.

    For Ceroxylon, I think it was C. quindiuense in Colombia, at about 11,500'
     

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