Maple Tree Suggestions

Discussion in 'Maples' started by zenshack, Mar 23, 2010.

  1. zenshack

    zenshack Active Member

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    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    I want to plant an ornamental/ shade tree in my back yard and would really like it to be a maple.

    The problem I am running into is the ultimate height of the tree. I would prefer it to reach a maximum height of 30-40' but this is proving to be hard to find. There are no Japanese Maples in my research that come even close to this height and the next closest maples are Red (rubrum), or Norway but these all seem to grow up to 50 - 60'.

    Any suggestions?

    I have attached a picture of my yard where I generally want to plant the tree (The taller bamboo stick). Along the row of smaller sticks we have already planted Emerald Cedars (The second pic).

    The maple would also act as a partial privacy screen for the townhouse accross the road.

    Thanks
     

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  2. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Acer japonicum 'Meigetsu' and 'O isami' get 35 feet tall. Acer japonicum 'Vitifolium' gets 40 feet tall.
     
  3. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
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    Here are some pics of mature Japanese maples (mainly palmatums, amoenums and japonicums) where you may find some inspiration.

    Gomero
     

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  4. cthenn

    cthenn Active Member

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    Even if there are Ap's that would get that tall, it might take 20-30 years to achieve that kind of height. You are talking like what you want will do this and that, but none of the maples that I know of will get that kind of height in any "reasonable" amount of time. By the time your maple gets to be 40' tall, those townhouses across the street might be long gone and you are dealing with an even bigger Walmart or something :)

    Gomero...that last pic looks kind of sad...not very inspiring :p
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 23, 2010
  5. winterhaven

    winterhaven Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
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    zenshack,

    First, are you sure you want it that tall, maybe 20-25' would be satisfying? Next, the "authorities" keep increasing the projected heights of the trees. Third, Vancouver is about 2 hours from Amazing Maples (http://amazingmaples.com). If you want a large tree, call Charlie and ask him what he has that might fit the space without having to wait 20 years. I've gotten a few big trees from him and been really happy with their condition and his prices.

    Good luck and I'd love to hear which direction you end up going.

    PS. Might I suggest 'Umegae'? If indeed that is what my mystery tree is, it has been a true joy. http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/forums/showthread.php?p=202929&highlight=Umegae#post202929
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2010
  6. emery

    emery Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    In the Norway maple cultivars there is 'Globosum' which is certainly smaller than the species, according to Harris to 30 ft. And it seems to be a pretty vigorous tree. The sugar maple A. sacharrum ssp. floridanum is significantly smaller, there are several cultivars to chose from. A. rufinerve, a fine snake barked species, can get to 40 ft and is a good grower. The rubrum selection Bowhall is smaller than the species, to about 40 ft. A. opalus is a marvelous, easy and little planted tree that may eventually reach 50 ft. A. cappadocicum ssp sinicum is an absolutely cracking medium-sized tree with gorgeous leaves, bright red new growth and samaras; one of my favorite maples.

    A. japonicum (or japonicum 'Vitifolium') would get there eventually, maybe!

    HTH

    -E
     
  7. dawgie

    dawgie Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    Here are some maples to consider:

    Acer griseum, Paperbark maple, 20-30'
    A. leucoderme, Chalk maple, 25-30'
    A. buergerianum, Trident maple, 25-35'
    A. mono, Painted maple, 30-40'
    A. negundo, Boxelder, 30-50'
    A. pseudo-platanus, Sycamore maple, 40-60'
    A. rubrum, 40-60'

    In my experience, most of these will grow larger than sizes listed here, for the species I am familiar with and under ideal conditions. Eg, I have seen red maples that were probably 80' tall although they typically don't get that large. For a more complete list, check this web site from NC State Univ. arboretum:

    http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/consumer/factsheets/trees-new/scientific_namesa_c.html
     
  8. zenshack

    zenshack Active Member

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    Location:
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    Thanks for all the suggestions!

    I laughed at the thought of there being a Walmart by my house one day! Also the websites suggested are great. I had no idea there were so many variations of Japanese Maples out there!

    My problem with a palmatum/ japonicum is they are 'generally' slow growers and I want a 15'+ shade tree asap.

    In a perfect world I would find a nice maple at the nursary around 7-9' (Easier to transplant and not too $$), that would grow relatively quickly to 15'+ (3+ years or so??), but ultimately top out around 30'+. Also I don't want a water greedy tree so I can get grass growing under it and nice fall colour is a must too. Am I asking too much?

    I understand about not worrying much about it's ultimate height as I probably won't be around to deal with it, but I always find it a shame when you see nice old houses with tree stumps in the yard or adult trees much too close together because someone 30,40,50 years ago didn't think about the long term when planting their saplings.

    Regarding the Norway Maple, I read somewhere that they are water greedy, is that true for most of it's cultivars, If so it is out for me?

    I also found info on A. rubrum 'Burgundy Belle'. Does anyone know much about this cultivar?

    Thanks again.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2010
  9. jacquot

    jacquot Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    Larchmont Z7, NY, USA
    I have found japonicum cultivars to be fairly fast growers. Buy a 5yr+ tree and before you know it it will be pretty large. Mine have grown a good 18" per year, branching nicely. The Triflorum/Griseum have been more like 12" per year. My Meigetsu is doing exceptionally well, and it does look like it will get pretty tall. I bought it to eventually be a 40' tree. It is not overnight, and one year birds decimated the new growth, but it is doing great.
     
  10. emery

    emery Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Burgundy Bell was selected for fall color. Hight seems to be to around 40 ft. Seems like a good candidate, although rubrum tends to color less in milder climates like Vancouver. (In general, I don't know if this is true for BB).

    I haven't found Norwary maple to be particulary thirsty, and it does seem to resist drought well. I don't think it will provide as much fall color as the red maple (or the other various Japanese or Chinese maples under discussion). Also invasive and over planted in some areas.

    Dawgie FYI A. mono is now called A. pictum. I think this one (and the sycamore) will get too big for the spot. (I would have suggested Trident also, but thought that was too small!) However both these are very fast growing, attractive trees.

    Your neighbors might not thank you for planting a Norway or Sycamore. They favor us with thousands of little-uns every year if the conditions are right!

    -E
     
  11. dawgie

    dawgie Active Member 10 Years

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    Chalk maple is native to the Southeast USA and not used much in landscaping but it should be. It is one of the prettiest maples I have seen, if you can find one. They typically are multi-trunked with whitish bark (hence the chalk in name). Nice fall color. Some consider a Southern subspecies of the sugar maple.
     
  12. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
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    That's a good variety to start with.

    Paperbark maple and boxelder were two of the first that came to mind when I saw the title and opening post.

    Even Norway maple will take quite some time to reach 40'.
     
  13. Arktrees

    Arktrees Member

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    Location:
    NW Arkansas
    Acer truncatum - Shantung Maple might fit your needs.

    http://www.metromaples.com/Shantung.htm

    The link is to a grower in Texas that has several new cultivators under development. We got "Fire Dragon" from him before it was licensed by Greenleaf (HUGH grower if you don't know). So far have gotten about 24"/yr, but believe there is a good chance for that to improve, and they get a good deal more than that in North Texas.

    Arktrees
     
  14. alex66

    alex66 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    i vote pseudoplatanus Nizetii :-)
     
  15. emery

    emery Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Seconded!
     
  16. zenshack

    zenshack Active Member

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    Location:
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    There it is,

    After much thought and discussion, we ended up going with a palmatum.

    Hard to see in the photo but it is around 8-9 ft tall.

    Thanks again for everyones input!!
     

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