magnolia stellata: smaller or slower-growing varieties?

Discussion in 'Magnoliaceae' started by eric_r, Feb 5, 2007.

  1. eric_r

    eric_r Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
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    We are trying to decide about planting a magnolia stellata to give focus to an area of the garden north of a 6 foot cedar hedge that currrently includes the following plants:

    Charles de Mills rose (doesn't suit the area and we may try to move it)
    yellow crocosmia
    aster polar light
    baptisia australis
    buddleia (at the back)
    hellenium (at the back)
    oenothera missourensis
    various irises
    various coreopsis
    japanese anemone (at the back)

    Are there any varieties of magnolia stellata (ideally pink blossomed) that are smaller and/or slower growing than others that might suit that area? We want to avoid something too big that will shade out the area too much.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Too big = ?
     
  3. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Fraser Valley, B.C. ,Canada
    Maybe M. stellata rosea. About 9' high by 6' wide here at 14 years old, could prune easily. Early bloom, before M. denudata. Don't think it's fragrant.
     

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  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Plant shown looks like 'Leonard Messel'.
     
  5. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    M. 'Leonard Messel' blooms later here and darker pink. i thought it might have been once, too
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2007
  6. silver_creek

    silver_creek Active Member

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    Magnolia stellata 'Jane Platte' is pretty slow growing. One of the deepest pink stellatas to my eyes.
     
  7. Gordo

    Gordo Active Member 10 Years

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    I like 'Jane Platt' too, not just for color, but for the large number of tepals. Not sure how big these will ultimately get. Here's a photo:

    'Miss Jane Platte'.JPG
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2007
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    'Jane Platt' has been pale here also, as in above photo. Growth has been erect. Best bet for a squat plant with strong coloring might be one acquired as 'Rubra'.
     
  9. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Here, M. stellata rosea seems to hold it's pink colour best with the cooler temps, but also flowers up more slowly. If the days are warmer, it becomes white sooner.
     
  10. eric_r

    eric_r Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks very much, Chimera, Ron B, Silver Creek, and Gordo for your suggestions and photos.

    We'll consider all your suggestions as we look for plants this spring.
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Old name like 'Rosea' (and perhaps 'Rubra') will by now be covering several clones. Another factor to be aware of is that descriptions of these do not line up very well with what one encounters under these names. (Pink cultivars of locusts (Robinia) have the same problem).
     

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