Magnolia in Ottawa

Discussion in 'Magnoliaceae' started by Lynette, May 16, 2008.

  1. Lynette

    Lynette Active Member

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    Location:
    Ottawa Canada
    I just received a magnolia to plant in my garden. Does it need to be in a protected area? I have a large open area that I'm beginning to landscape. It lies south of the house with two large spruces to the west and a stand of spruces/pines to the east. It would be about 30 feet from the house and trees.

    A second place would be closer to the house bordered by the stand of trees to the east and open to the west. Protected by the house to the north. Full sun from 10 AM on.

    Thanks,
    Lynette
     
  2. smivies

    smivies Active Member

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    Location:
    Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    In Ottawa, a magnolia would prefer not to be on a wind swept plain, but no extra protection is really needed. If you're in the urban 'heat island' it should be fine. If you live in a rural area, a bit more shelter would be helpful but not required.

    Check out the Magnolia collection at the Dominion arboretum (across the road from the experimental farm) to get an idea of acceptable siting.
     
  3. Lynette

    Lynette Active Member

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    Location:
    Ottawa Canada
    Thank you. We will wander over there today.

    The magnolia is a Soulangiana 'Betty'. It's about 4' tall and in a burlap ball. How soon should I plant it? I'll research the soil preparation but if you have any suggestions, I'd appreciate it.

    Lynette
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    'Betty' is one of the Kosar and de Vos hybrids from the US National Arboretum and not a saucer magnolia.

    http://www.usna.usda.gov/Newintro/magnoli1.html

    As with all trees and shrubs it should have the burlap, twine and nails etc. removed at planting, and should also be planted in a hole backfilled with the same soil that came out of it, without modification. What works best with long-term subjects such as these is to select kinds that are adapted to your existing soil and plant those in that same soil, mulching afterward. However, if you are convinced your plant would benefit from tinkering with your soil conditions either acquire some better soil and place at least 6 inches of that on top of the existing soil, and plant into that new layer, without blending it into the soil below - or incorporate organic amendments into the entire potential rooting area for many years. With a magnolia this would be a space several yards across.
     

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