Looking for Botanist to Fact Check my Writing

Discussion in 'Plants: Science and Cultivation' started by Alexander2, May 17, 2020.

  1. Alexander2

    Alexander2 New Member

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    Hey everyone,
    I've put together a few articles that get into botany territory. I'm trying to get the best content possible out there and would love if someone would be willing to take the time to fact-check a few of my articles. I'd be happy to acknowledge you by name and link to you online if you have a presence.

    I would think the level of botany/genetics required is undergraduate level at the highest.

    I can say two things with confidence about the accuracy of my blog:
    I'm 100% confident that my articles aren't 100% scientifically correct
    I'm 100% confident they're better than the top ranking search results on the same topics, so they're a step in the right direction, even if they're not there yet.

    Let me know if you'd like to help me spread some truth!

    Thanks for stopping by!
    Alex
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Can you post a snippet?
     
  3. Alexander2

    Alexander2 New Member

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    Certainly!

    "
    First, let’s get to the quick answer, then we’ll walk through a bit of a story through multiple generations that illustrates the ideas of open-pollinated, heirloom, and hybrid (F1) seed genetics.

    Heirloom seeds have been genetically inter-bred from original open-pollinated seeds to stabilize the genetics and traits of the plants. Heirloom seeds usually reliably produce similar plants, fruits, and flowers generation after generation. Different genetic lines within or between species can be bred together to create F1 hybrids which often have superior vigor and desirable traits that are difficult to achieve from heirloom or open-pollinated varieties.

    The easiest way to think about it is through these analogies/simplifications:

    • Wild seeds are open-pollinated in nature.
    • Heirloom seeds are like antiques, if an item is old enough, and nice enough, it’s an antique, similarly for seeds: if the genetics are old enough, and stable enough, it’s an heirloom.
    • F1 hybrids are the first generation of offspring from two stabilized genetic lines.
    "
    -me
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    So is this primarily about understanding botany for food production? Not my forte. If no nibbles here, there might be someone at Seeds of Diversity Canada who could step in: Home | Seeds of Diversity
     
  5. Alexander2

    Alexander2 New Member

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    I'm building a bunch of guides and how-tos for growing microgreens. Topics wander around a bit but they're grouped around practical knowledge. Not tooooo deep into the botany/genetics knowledge.

    Thanks for the help Daniel.

    You guys have a ridiculously large garden! I've visited many times.
     

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