Living Hedge

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by mhern, Feb 23, 2012.

  1. mhern

    mhern Active Member

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    Is there anyone out there who has experienced using Willows as living hedge? http://www.bluestem.ca/ carries them but I wonder if there's anyone here in the lower mainland who has tried doing it and how did the experience go. Any info would be much appreciated.
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Not very suitable - poor shape for a hedge, invasive roots, prone to disease and dieback, bare in winter.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The one you see used is Salix purpurea. Even lends itself to shearing.
     
  4. mhern

    mhern Active Member

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    Hi Michael - thanks. I don't really care if it's bare during winter months as we're not at the back anyway. It's more of when we're outside in the summer as our neighbors have 3 vicious dogs.

    Ron B - yes those are the Salix ones.

    Thanks.
     
  5. Tree Nut

    Tree Nut Active Member

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    In the case of vicious dogs, perhaps an Osage Orange hedge may be more appropriate. The thorns would keep them away...
     
  6. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years

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    Barberry is thorny; so is pyracantha. They both afford winter interest.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    All willows are Salix. I wasn't talking about your link, if that was your point. What I said was the ones seen being used for this during everyday circumstances are S. purpurea. There's a sheared hedge of it at a commercial property near I-5 in Bellingham, for instance.
     
  8. mhern

    mhern Active Member

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    Somehow my post earlier isn't published :(

    Anyway, I forgot to mention that it's quite a long yard (200 feet long) that we're trying to solve here so the cheapest and most economical solution is the number one choice :).

    I might just settle with 100' of Karl Foerster and 100' of any willows (I like the Rubikins and yes, those Purpureas). I was thinking that if I have willows, then I might discover another hobby (aside from gardening) in the future, which is basketry ha-ha.

    Thanks for all the input.
     
  9. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years

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    Well, maybe over time you could add, on your side of the willows, a mixed hedge of roses and viburnums and rhodos and lilacs and oregon grapes, and... So many possibilities!
     

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