Let's try historical plaques

Discussion in 'Plants and Biodiversity Stumpers' started by Weekend Gardener, Aug 5, 2006.

  1. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Where is this plaque located?

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  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Vancouver?

    Looks like she planted some Lolium perenne at the same time . . .
     
  3. wrygrass2

    wrygrass2 Active Member 10 Years

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    But Rye grass doesn't narrow down the location very much. :) Lolium perenne from USDA is found in every state in the US and by extrapolation probably in most of the Canadian provinces.

    Evidently not the only Oak the then Princess Elizabeth planted in 1951.

    And for a picture of Queen Elizabeth planting the Vancouver tree you might look here. I thought the location was aptly named. :)

    Harry
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2006
  4. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Harry,
    You are an amazing walking encyclopedia.

    Yes, that must be the tree. I am not sure if the Duck pond existed in those days. 55 years later, the tree has grown to be quite a handsome specimen.

    Queen Elizabeth Park is full of "Plaques". Here are pictures of another one.

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  5. wrygrass2

    wrygrass2 Active Member 10 Years

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    The recent history of Lebanon truly makes that plaque poignant indeed. Ever since hostilities started there, my poor peace rose that hasn't gotten the best of care has been blooming up a storm, even in the midst of our hottest weather. Personally I take that as a sign. :) It is too bad that others don't. :( Harry
     
  6. wrygrass2

    wrygrass2 Active Member 10 Years

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    Also, not my encyclopedic knowledge, Google's. :) Harry
     
  7. Laurie

    Laurie Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Although the site and species may seem obvious, there is really is little archival information available online regarding the details, so Harry, it actually took some time to find it based on the choice of keywords. It was indeed a Quercus robur that the Princess planted in Queen Elizabeth Park. www.heritagevancouver.org/pdf/hv_news_2006_02_web.pdf. Princess Elizabeth and her husband toured Canada in 1951 in place of her father, the ailing King George VI. In February 1952, following the death of her father, she became Queen. Queen Elizabeth Park seems to have been named after the Queen Mother, however, in 1939.
     
  8. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Laurie is right on. The significance of this particular oak tree is that it was planted in the year in which she was last a princess. I doubt that she planted many other trees after that, since winter was approaching in the Northern hemisphere after that. And she would have been too preoccupied. Could this be the last tree she ever planted publicly before being crowned Queen?
     
  9. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    If there's too many plaques, try contacting a dentist to have the excess plaque removed.
     
  10. wrygrass2

    wrygrass2 Active Member 10 Years

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    Laurie,

    Thanks for the update Laurie. I guess I just assumed that since the tree she planted at Ravenwood was an English Oak or Quercus robur, that the one in Vancouver would be too. Never should assume though. As Felix Unger once said, "It makes a (donkey) out of u and me." :) Also assumed it was named for HRH Queen Elizabeth II and not the Queen Mother. Goes to show how easy it is to 'lead yourself down the garden path'. But then it's in my nature to go such places.

    Harry
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2006
  11. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Here is the tree in question, right by the Duck pond.

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  12. wrygrass2

    wrygrass2 Active Member 10 Years

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    Great tree. Now there's a garden path I'd walk down any day. Harry
     
  13. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Harry, watch out for the duck and geese droppings if you do.
     

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