Leaves of Monstera Deliciosa browning and dying

Discussion in 'Araceae' started by Minoo, Jan 15, 2021.

  1. Minoo

    Minoo New Member

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    Hello, I am new to this forum so apologies if I have missed a posting about this that has already answered my question.
    I have three Monstera Deliciosa plants in my living room that all seem to start showing the same symptoms. One is around 7 years old and the other two are just a year old and were propagated using cutting from this older plant. They are all a couple of feet apart ( not touching each other). One of the younger plants first started showing signs of unhappiness with the leaves getting brown but not dry (soft). Then the new growth on the old plant showed signs of getting brown on the edges and then I noticed the 3rd plant showing the same symptoms. The leaves are getting dark brown starting from the edge of the plant. I have not changed the watering routine and I have not fertilized them since September.
    Any thoughts on what is happening to my lovely plants. Please let me know if there is any other information that can help troubleshoot this problem.
    Your help and input is much appreciated.
     

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  2. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

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    Hello Minoo, welcome to the forum. Have you had these in you care the whole time, going all the way back 7 years? They seem to be blocked from getting much of the light from the window. Do they get some sun on the leaves every day? If so, for how long? These symptoms are culture related, so you need to look for changes that may have happened in the last year or two that lowered the light, reduced the minimum night temps, increased the watering, reduced the drainage under the pot, or some combination of those. For instance maybe a big tree finally grew up next to the window and reduced the light when it was already near the minimum, or maybe a family member moved them a couple feet away from the light because they were starting to block the walking path around them as the grew up. Many possibilities! You need to do some detective work to see if you can identify which of those 4 factors may be involved, or you could just improve all 4 those factors (especially light) and you'll guarantee success. :)
     
  3. Minoo

    Minoo New Member

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    Hello Tom, thank you for your feedback.
    I have had the older plant for 7 years and younger was were propagated from the cuttings of the mother plant (older plant). I had to move the older plant around 5 feet to the back of the room in August 2019 so it can lean on the wall. The room where all my plants are has one wall of windows and vaulted ceiling so Lots of light. But being in Vancouver we don’t get much sun in fall and winter . The younger plants are much closer to the window. But this morning I was checking again and some of the younger leaves on the younger plant is getting a bit of an orange shade and some are showing black spots in the middle of the leave. I am becoming quite worried now. Any other thoughts ? I have attached more pics. thank you
     

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  4. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

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    That's good to know. If it was moved to the back of the room in Aug 2019, that makes perfect sense with what we're seeing. A very slow dying back. I know you said 'lots of light', but perhaps you're not aware of how much these really want. The internet says it wants "indirect" light. This is false. Unfortunately it's a widespread myth, because these plants do seem to survive and grow a little bit in indirect light, but only when young. Indoors they want almost full sun, and at least a few hours a day of actually sunlight directly hitting the leaves. It sounds like maybe you currently have zero hours of direct sun. This won't support those huge, beautiful, fenestrated leaves that we all want. If you have every other parameter (drainage, temperature, watering, etc.) virtually perfect, then it's possible to survive in indirect light, but not thrive. The low light (even though you think of it as "lots") makes any mistakes you make in the other parameters vastly amplified. So low light is your problem, with additional minor possible problems in other parameters like watering, soil, etc.
     
  5. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    Human eye is a poor tool for evaluating light intensity, because it is very adaptable.
    To evaluate lighting conditions, a camera is much better tool. Take a shot of your plant, and check properties of the photo.
    If Aperture x Shutter speed x ISO is less than 1/8, then this place is relatively well lit (well lit, if 1/16 or less).
    If the result is equal or above 1, then this place is poorly lit.
    A sample: F1/2 * 1/100 sec * ISO 200 = 1
     
  6. Minoo

    Minoo New Member

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    Thanks for both responses. I will do some tests with the 2 other smaller monsteras that I have which are showing the same exact symptoms. Though they are not that far from the wall of windows I will move them right next to window to see if their condition improves.
    thanks again
     
  7. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

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    Btw, I'm sure you already know this, but individual damaged leaves will not ever repair. The whole plant will improve by growing more new perfect leaves. That's where you'll see the improvement. However nothing can restore single damaged leaves. Fortunately Monstera grow fast when they're happy! :)
     
  8. Minoo

    Minoo New Member

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    Yes. I am hoping for some improvements but not for the leaves that are already damaged. Should I cut the leaves that are showing signs of orange shade or the black spots?
     
  9. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

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    They're not really a risk to the overall plant to just leave them, so you can cut them as they become too unsightly to look at. If a plant is recovering, I like to leave as many leaves as possible that are more than half green, but for me a healthy plant has to have near perfect leaves or off with its head!
     

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