Kosteletzkya virginica

Discussion in 'Annuals, Biennials, Perennials, Ferns and Bulbs' started by GRSJr, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    I've been trying to grow this plant in Raleigh, NC where my soil is clay and acid. No luck in the last 4 years. They just wither away.

    The plants grow wild at the beach in the sandy muck.

    I've tried adding sand to the soil, but no luck.

    Need advice.
     
  2. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    Doesn't anyone grow Seashore Mallow????
     
  3. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hi GRSJr,

    If they are withering then it sounds like you are keeping them too dry. They grow in brackish marshes.

    Newt
     
  4. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    OK. Thanks.

    I can supply the water, but what should I do about the "brackish"?
     
  5. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  6. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    I know Tony and Kim, but thanks for the links.

    I guess this is my question; could the acid clay soil be a problem. Do I need to add lime? Seashore locations are often full of lime bearing shells.
     
  7. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    The links I gave you had some info on how they are grown and what seems to work. I did quite a bit of reading about these plants and not all bog areas are alkaline, many are acid. Hence peat! I used many terms when I was googling, one of which was:
    Kosteletzkya virginica + pH

    so, if you think your soil is too acid, and adding lime will bring it to a more neutral state, then I'd say go ahead and add a cup of lime and see if it helps. It seems the key to their success is the moisture. They seem to like it wet.

    Newt
     
  8. GRSJr

    GRSJr Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks. I'll see to it they get lots of water.
     

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