Kennedia coccinea - Oz to Canada

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by stargrass, Dec 29, 2005.

  1. stargrass

    stargrass Member

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    I've been warned - This species in it's native environment is very invasive! I have a two year old member of this species and this is it's first winter/ summer exposed to the elements (winter/summer=winter here, summer in native Australia).
    I am curious weither anyone has some wisdom to share concerning their experiences over wintering this resiliant but somewhat tender (min 5*c) species.
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    An off-topic note on terminology - I'm fairly certain that the word "invasive" isn't used when describing plants in their native habitat. "Aggressive" or "successful", perhaps - anyway, with that sort of tenderness, I doubt it would display those qualities here.

    As for growing a plant this tender, I wonder if the folks in the Palm forums have written advice for palms that would be somewhat applicable. I imagine the difficulty with Kennedia is that it is a climber - maybe a customized system of warm pipes to climb!
     
  3. John Allen

    John Allen Member

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    Mmmm...in my experience, the Coral Vine, Kennedia coccinea, is not invasive. It is a beautiful addition to the native bushland around where I live. It seems to prefer sandy loams around limestone deposits (Tuart woodlands), but is equally happy as a ground cover in lightly wooded Jarrah/Banksia woodlands, with an slightly acidic topsoil. Along with Hardenbergia and a number of small Acacia species, it would be my pick in a direct seeding mix for rehabilitation works. It is very much a pioneering ground cover species, but becomes secondary as other other trees and shrubs recolonize disturbed areas. In undisturbed areas, it is common and rambles over ground and logs, but is not an able climber like Hardenbergia comptoniana.
     
  4. John Allen

    John Allen Member

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    PS...the nearest snow I get is about 300 km south in the Porongorup Ranges, and not in all years. My point is, Kennedia coccinea, is a mediterranean species and likely not suited to the outdoors in Canada, where winter snow is the norm (yes?) and therefore Kennedia coccinea, is highly unlikely to take on weed status.
     
  5. John Allen

    John Allen Member

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    PPS. This thread on the UBC site originated by stargrass has its roots at the GardenWeb forum, viz:

    http://www.au.gardenweb.com/forums/load/oznative/msg1217261315253.html?5

    Greg Boyles raised generic environmental concerns about use of non-indigenous species. [I think wheat is another species not native to Canada ;) ]
    However, Nathan Hurst more than adequately addressed these concerns. Nathan grows the plants, first-hand, and understands their limitations. Time and time again, Western Australian species cause heart ache for gardeners in eastern Australia. Afficianados have been driven to grafting Western Australian species, esp. Proteacea, onto compatible rootstocks. That's how tricky they can be. Against this horticultural backdrop, the 'Canadian weed alerts' about Western Australian species are more a case of crying wolf, methinks.
     
  6. stargrass

    stargrass Member

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    Last Winter, this beautiful vine actually thrived! Producing new growth no less!
    THIS year is a whole other story. I live on the North Shore of Vancouver, BC, which normally has predictably mild winters (0 C at best and lots of rain). But this mid Autumn freeze up has just devoured all even somewhat tender plants of their normally lush, green vibrancy.
    I wonder how well kennedia coccinea will thrive in the wake of our freakishly cold Fall of 2006? I await the Spring to learn more...
     
  7. stargrass

    stargrass Member

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    P.S. Indeed the warning I recieved about this being an invasive species here had to have been a misunderstanding. I see this now!
    Our weather is just too unpredictably COLD!!!
     
  8. John Allen

    John Allen Member

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    stargrass, I hope you got flowers and especially seed. Perhaps you can treat it as an annual or biennial. Have you seen our Sturt Desert Pea?
     
  9. stargrass

    stargrass Member

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    I did get flowers, yes! Exotic clusters of red flowers... But, alas, I did not think of collecting the seeds. I don't believe she is dead, so perhaps when she flowers again, I might think of this.
    Does this Sturt Desert Pea thrive in a woodland or part sun setting? Is it another Australian? I will try to check it out!
     
  10. John Allen

    John Allen Member

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    stargrass, desert peas grow in full sun in desert areas (around 10 inches rain pa) of Australia -and I'm guessing here- that inland California and south to Mexico would be similar, re climate.

    Burkes Backyard site is very good with notes on grafting and rootstock, at:
    http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/19...flowering_plants_and_shrubs/sturts_desert_pea

    OR:
    http://farrer.csu.edu.au/ASGAP/s-formos.html

    The following site:
    http://www.anbg.gov.au/emblems/sa.emblem.html
    has some nice pics and reference to "...but grafted on to Colutea arborescens, Bladder Senna, it produced an admirable plant for hanging baskets."
    The usual rootstock, is Clianthus puniceus, native to New Zealand. There is reference here to tissue culture, to continue the line of sports with different coloured flowers. I guess the cloned lines would be grafted onto Clianthus puniceus. Good luck with with your Coral pea. Sounds like she needs TLC during the cold weather, and nurse her thru til it warms up.
    I wonder if she up picked root rot in her second year?
    Are your Ozzies planted outdoors or are they potted specimens and kept in shelter?
     
  11. John Allen

    John Allen Member

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  12. John Allen

    John Allen Member

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    sorry stargrass...the UBC has pruned back the link each time I try.
    Try a Google ("World") search using sturt desert pea, then look for the Burkes Backyard link.
     
  13. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    There's nothing wrong with the link... just click on it, and it works fine.
     
  14. stargrass

    stargrass Member

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    Thank you John Allen for all those thoughtful links! I now feel aquainted with the Sturt desert Pea, and she is beautiful! Perhaps she would thrive well in say, Osoyoos, BC or even through out the Okanagan, but here in North Vancouver... too many tall evergreens and too much rain I fear. But the flowers are comparably dramatic to the kennedia coccinea... Both have those profuse clusters of ripe red flowers.
    Thank You
     
  15. John Allen

    John Allen Member

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    You are welcome, stargrass. We seem to have gone full circle, from the weed aspect, to the realization that, due to the climatic difference betwixt desert Australia versus (all of?) Canada, Australian (warm climate) plants are not weed candidates and are tender at best in cultivation in Canada. Yes?
    I went off topic I guess suggesting Sturts desert pea. My main interest there tho, (apart from the desert pea's beauty) was the possibilty of grafting Clianthus onto disease resistant root stock. And the possibilty that this approach could be applied to your Kennedias etc.
    At the risk of going OT again, and because New Zealand Clianthus may be sensitive to the Canadian climates, perhaps you could look at something a little more toward the South Pole. There are other (South Island) New Zealand peas (http://www.rhizobia.co.nz/taxonomy/legume.html) as well as those from Tasmania (eg. Pultenaeas).
    I am having problems getting onto the Assn. Societies Growng Native Aust. Plants site: http://asgap.org.au/ , but may well be something there that suits you. I'm thinking that cool climate Australasian species Aus. + NZ) may be more suited to your climate.
    CAVEAT. If you were to grow some Aussie pea seeds, check on the poison status of the species you are working with, especially if you have small children, dogs, cats, or livestock. I have a local species called Lamb Poison!!!
    http://farrer.csu.edu.au/ASGAP/APOL7/sep97-4.html
     
  16. John Allen

    John Allen Member

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  17. stargrass

    stargrass Member

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    John,
    Tangents are allowed!
    I find that many New Zealand natives thrive in my climate zone. The Kennedia was a bit of a stretch, as I knew it's tenderness when I aquired it.
    One of my favorite Australian natives is the Jacaranda momisifolia(sp?). There are a few big old individuals around the UBC Botanical Gardens that are just STUNNING in the Spring!!! I adore those purple flowers.
    I will definately share with you my observations of new growth on my Kennedia coccinea as winter mellows and spring inspires. I am pretty excited to bear witness myself. For me, gardening is still very much experimental. I dought I'll ever loose my curious sense of awe.
     
  18. stargrass

    stargrass Member

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    P.S. The first time I saw a Jacaranda in full bloom was almost spiritual. During a visit to Sydney in Spring, they were EVERYWHERE! I visited the Botanical garden there, learned a bit more and wrote a poem about it's symbolic beauty.
     
  19. stargrass

    stargrass Member

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    Talk about tangents!!!
     

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