Jane Magnolia

Discussion in 'Magnoliaceae' started by Computer Geek, Mar 27, 2007.

  1. Computer Geek

    Computer Geek Member

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    Hi, I live in Las Vegas, NV and we are redoing our front yard. We purchased a new Jane Magnolia tree to replace a Plum tree that has died. I would like to know how long it takes for a Magnolia tree to mature? Is there anything special I should know before I plant the tree. Also, when and how do I prune this particular tree, I know there are different procedures for different trees. Thank you, Jon Lowry
     
  2. Gordo

    Gordo Active Member 10 Years

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    'Jane' is one of the Kosar/Devos hybrids. More information is available about these by doing a search on the Magnolia Forum. I think these tend to bloom at an earlier age than many other Magnolias. Planting directions would probably not differ significantly from general practices for woody plants - digging a suitably sized hole (3 x wider than rootball, and just slightly deeper), planting just a bit higher than grade to account for settling, mulching with wood chips or similar mulch, keep watered regularly for at least 1 year.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    If you have alkaline soil chlorosis might have to be dealt with. No pruning should be needed. Cross between two shrubby, hardy kinds, if successful becoming a big bush maybe 12' x 15' within a reasonable period of time, eventually larger.

    See Sunset WESTERN GARDEN BOOK (currently in stock at CostCo) for additional information, including regional suitability.
     
  4. The_Irish_Patient

    The_Irish_Patient Member

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    Jon,

    I planted a Jane magnolia one year ago. I'm no expert; here's all I've got.

    This plant likes moisture and a slightly acidic soil. My "soil" here in the Connecticut River valley of Southern Massachusetts is nothing but fine sand. No organic content and nothing to hold moisture. So I dug a hole six feet in diameter and 18 inches deep (the depth of the burlap wrapped root ball) and backfilled with a mix of one shovel of sphagnum moss for every one or two shovels of soil. I then replaced the turf layer except directly over the root ball. The root ball was given some plastic edging around the periphery with mulch in the center.

    The magnolia looks like its been in that spot forever. I was advised not to fertilize it at all during the first year. I just watered the turf over the back fill very deeply to keep the back fill moist down to the 18 inches.

    The magnolia looked very, very happy last Summer. Leaves and flowers were a little sparse, however; not surprising, considering the disparity between the size of the tree (seven feet tall after being planted in the ground) versus its 18 inch diameter burlap wrapped root ball.

    Flower buds are reasonably numerous this year and are just starting to open up. I'm fertilizing it this year as though it was a large house plant, using a weak mix of Jack's Orchid Special (30-10-10). I don't think that I'll see what the plant really looks like until this time next year.

    Be warned that the Jane magnolia has a reputation (at least in Southern New England) for being a very slow growing dwarf. I didn't see any growth at all last Summer. I'm told that it will max out at about 15 feet tall, and will only grow about four inches per year. Left to itself, it will look more like a big shrub than a tree. It can be pruned to be more tree like, but I haven't worked that out for myself yet.

    Also, I've seen a few web sites that suggest planting a Jane magnolia so that it's shaded at noon, but receives direct sun most of the day. I didn't follow this advice. Mine is doing well with full Southern exposure, but my climate is a lot cooler than yours. You may want to check this out with your local nurseries.

    Best of luck.
     
  5. colleen@mooreinet.com

    colleen@mooreinet.com Member

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    Hi, I was hoping someone could help me. I bought a small Magnolia Jane, about 3 ft. high and understand that it needs afternoon Shade ( I live in the Dallas area of Texas), anyway, I don't have a large enough spot to plant it for afternoon shade and wondered if I could prune and shape it into a small tree? This way I would be able to limit the later afternnon sun. I just don't want it to look too unusual.

    Thanks for your help,
    Colleen
     

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