Hedges: Italian Cypress as Hedge

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by TracyB, Apr 1, 2007.

  1. TracyB

    TracyB Member

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    I want to plant a row of tightly spaced Italian Cypress along one side of my yard. I only want the height to get to about 8 feet. Can one 'top' Italian Cypress to create a uniform hedge or will that kill it?
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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  3. alex66

    alex66 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Cupressus semprervirens "Horizontalis" as well for you
     
  4. TracyB

    TracyB Member

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    Thanks for the replies. The horizontalis version sounds very promising. Now I just have to find them here in Arizona!!
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    "Horizontalis" is just a term that has been used to differentiate a Cupressus sempervirens with level branches from a columnar one. You are still talking about a tree well over 8 ft. tall.

    http://conifers.org/cu/cup/sempervirens.htm

    The cultivar I provided a link to is a dwarf version of Italian cypress, sold by a major company that services all manner of retail outlets over a big area. Should have been just what you were looking for.
     
  6. TracyB

    TracyB Member

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    Hi Ron,
    I went to the website you provided and the dwarf version's slow growth concerns me. I think I'd rather have a fast growing cultivar and simply aggressively prune it back for the shape (3-4 feet in width by 8-10 feet in height) that I am seeking. I may be totally off base and appreciate all input from the experts before I plunk down 20 some odd plants. Someone else here in the Phoenix area suggested Yellow Banks Rose that could be pruned as a hedge. Comments? :)

    TracyB
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    I'd forget about planting towering cigars and keeping them whacked down to an extremely low height, instead to get 8' x 4' comparatively quickly* look into various broadleaf evergreen shrubs. Sunset WESTERN GARDEN BOOK has a plants for hedges and screens section in its plant selection portion near the front from which you may be able to compile a list of candidates for your Sunset Climate Zone, after using their zone maps to find out which one you are in. Reading descriptions of those being considered in their plant encyclopedia section (and other references) may result in something you think you will like being identified.

    *Everyone wants an instant short hedge, unfortunately as a rule quick plants grow big and short ones are more or less slow. A big fast item pruned low will be quick to grow back out of shape each time it is pruned down, creating a chronic maintenance headache and likely resulting in an ugly effect
     
  8. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    We use the various Pittosporums- around here for quick hedging that will grow high and not too wide. It may however not be suitable for yr area.

    a pic of a variety

    http://www.hellohello.com.au/stirling.html

    Liz
     
  9. conifers

    conifers Active Member

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    A slower cultivar should be desired. Check with any local nursery for larger plants being brought in. Monrovia is a massive operation. This way you don't plunk the money into the ground and not get the correct plant.

    Dax
     
  10. Dixie

    Dixie Active Member

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    i have actually heard of this being done with Taxodium mucronatum to control erosion. they are planted very close, 3'-4' and then shaped into a hedge. in southern texas. not sure how aesthetically pleasing it is, but different.
     
  11. alex66

    alex66 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Sorry only today I see 10=<2m , For me is OK Buxus sempervirens, (is together Cupressus the base of Italian garden)the must plant for "Topary art",many cultivar avaible in the world(variegated ,darwf ,uprigth,)tolerant dry conditions etc.the only cultivar high >10feet is Buxus Balearica .Ciao alex
     
  12. TracyB

    TracyB Member

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    Thank you again to everyone for their insights. Ron B and Conifers, I hear what you're saying about the slower cultivar and think I may have found one. Thuja occidentalis 'Emerald Green' (T.o. 'Smaragd'). It grows to 15 feet tall and 3-4 feet wide and does well with being trimmed as a formal hedge. :)
     
  13. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Very commonly sold and planted. Check suitability for your climate and soil before purchasing.
     

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