British Columbia: is red elderberry polymorphic?

Discussion in 'Pacific Northwest Native Plants' started by Jake Sherlock, Jun 14, 2020.

  1. Jake Sherlock

    Jake Sherlock New Member

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    This morning I cut a stem from one of my suffering Elders that was not fully dead yet.I brought it inside and looked at it under my bench top magnifier.I split the stem open and looked at the pith and any signs of borers. The telltale black staining was at the bottom so I carefully peeled back the bark ,moving up the stem. The bark is very thin although this stem is only about 1 inch in diameter. I could clearly see where black staining turns to green....maybe 8 inches up. I chose this stem because it wasn't fully dead yet so I could see this. The leaves had fallen but the stem was mostly still green/living. Maybe this is Honey Fungus. I read that one in Oregon state is considered the largest living organism on the plant! Yikes! I'm going to cut some larger stem and dissect those as well.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    You appear to be confusing honey fungus with verticillium wilt.
     
  3. Jake Sherlock

    Jake Sherlock New Member

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    Ron,in an earlier post you mentioned Honey Fungus and said you'd seen some of that going on. So I read up regarding the Rhizomorph thing and inspected the stems as you have suggested. Are you now saying I should be looking elsewhere for answers?
     
  4. Jake Sherlock

    Jake Sherlock New Member

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    Alright ,I've just done a power read on the Wilt! Yup ,Ron,I see your steering me in the right direction I think. Not good news either way though. I see it can damage lots of plants. I notice this occurring in the native Elder all over this area and wonder if is drought related as we've experienced repeated drought seasons here in the last few years.
     
  5. scilover

    scilover New Member

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    Can you eat red elderberries?

    It is hard to ignore a wild edible that grows so commonly as Red Elderberry, but most wild food books caution against eating the berries, despite traditional use by nearly all the Native American groups in the Pacific Northwest. The flowers and fruit are cooked and eaten or made into wine or syrup.
     

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