Identification: Identification

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by StormTide, Mar 14, 2006.

  1. StormTide

    StormTide Member

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    Location:
    Duncan BC
    On our property in Duncan BC (22acres, about 10 treed in and around a stream) we have a lot of chanterelles every year. I've noticed that during the winter (and only during the winter) that there is a leafy like form that grows from about 30-40% of the chanterelle locations.

    Can anyone identify this species (i'm not 100% sure its a fungus, but they have no roots other than the spiky things you can see in the pictures, and are fairly tough in terms of the leaf but are extremely easily separated from the ground)

    Im wondering if there is a correlation between this and the chanterelles, as these leafy structures dont seem to exist anywhere where chanterelles havnt been known to grow on our property.

    Picture 1
    Picture 2

    Example of the chanterelles we find in abundance.
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Location:
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    Hi - this is a pelt (a lichen) - not sure of the species, as I'm about 1000 miles away from my book. You can read more about a related species, Peltigera membranacea here

    As for a relationship - it'd be interesting if there was one, but I don't know of any studies offhand that suggest that this is so.
     
  3. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    northern New Mexico, USA
    Wonderful photos.

    You may want to consider reducing the size of photos of future posts.
    Even with my high speed DSL, images of nearly 4 mb takes 30 seconds or so to download.
     
  4. Kildale

    Kildale Active Member

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    Location:
    Victoria. Canada
    I,ve been photographing lichens and mosses this year here in Victoria with an expert. I have put the lichen etc in these pages if you want to check out yours. LICHENS
     
  5. hamadryad

    hamadryad Active Member

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    Location:
    Morrison, CO, USA
    Great lichen page, Kildale! I'd like to link to it from my lichen site, http://coloradolichens.org if it's okay with you.

    Where did you get the common names? I've never heard P sulcata called "waxpaper" but it's very descriptive!
     
  6. Kildale

    Kildale Active Member

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    Hi. Pleased that you liked the pages and you are welcome to link it. I only do these sites for people to browse through so the more the merrier. I f my friend doen't know the common name I google it to find one.
     
  7. hamadryad

    hamadryad Active Member

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    Location:
    Morrison, CO, USA
    Thanks, Kildale! It's just that so few lichens have common names, so good that you are able to find some. I hadn't thought of googling specific types. Good to know.

    I don't know when I'll be updating the Colorado lichens site, but will try to remember to let the forums know when I do.
     
  8. Mycos

    Mycos Active Member

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    Location:
    Kamloops, BC. Canada
    Great photos! I was amazed at the detail with the picture zoomed in on. Behind the "Pelt" I see at least 2, possibly 3 different species of moss as well. Admittedly I'm not a expert with mosses so I could be way off, but I'm thinking that the upright or vertically (North-South) oriented ones are Rhytidiadelphus triquetrus. The one to the immediate right (not left, as I had stated in a previous edit) of the lichen being an excellent example of how the common name "Electrified Cats-Tail Moss" was arrived at. Towards the base of that there's another reddish stalked moss branching off horizontally to the right which I think is Hylocomium splendens. I can't make out a the "step" itself anywhere (perhaps at the top-center of the photo) on the other ones scattered through the photo, but the overall look of them is very reminiscent of specimens I've seen before.

    Btw. Why is the Tremella species in with lichens?
     

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