Identification: ID Request- Pleurotus ostreatus?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by 4ager, May 17, 2018.

  1. 4ager

    4ager Active Member

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    Location:
    British Columbia
    Habitat:Wood - Found in deciduous woods, growing on sides of a fallen rotting tree.

    Gills: white/beige gills

    Stem: varies from a few millimeters to a centimeter, thin.

    Cap: white/beige fan shaped

    Bruising: none

    Spore print: White

    General location: Pacific Northwest
     

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  2. Frog

    Frog Well-Known Member Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi 4ager - Agreed this does appear to be Pleurotus (ostreatus, pulmonarius et al). Thank you again for the clear specific observation details.

    For getting to know this species better, I recommend adding scale to your observations (though I can see the scale (1.5 or 2 inches across roughly) from comparing with the bit of cattail moss attached. Also doing a spore print to confirm it is white.

    In our region there are a few species that have beige spore prints that can look similar. They are not dangerous but some of them don't taste good. Most are considerably smaller than the Pleurotus, and have more even margins (more rounded appearance). Crepidotus mollis can be the same size as Pleurotus, but sort of an unpleasant shade/flabby texture and at least a bit scaly/hairy.

    Thank you for noting that this was in deciduous woods. In this region, Pleurotus turns up most commonly on Alder. Habitat (hardwood vs conifer), topside colour and season narrows down which of the oysters, noting of course sometimes we have fall species turning up in spring and vice versa some years. Pleurotus ostreatus, P. Pulmonarius like hardwoods, P. populinus likes specific hardwood, Pleurocybella porrigens likes conifers and the fall season (& is thinner) and Panellus serotinus likes the late fall and had darker and often green/orangey colours. Hypsizygus has faint circles, like watermarks, on top: I always hope folks won't eat this species as it does not appear often, and is pretty to see. Similarly Panellus longinquus (has a new name I think) is pink, striate and too small and cute to eat :-).

    This spring is a big fruiting season for oysters I've noticed!

    cheers :-)
    frog
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 17, 2018
  3. 4ager

    4ager Active Member

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    Thanks Frog. You are correct in your assumption that they are about 2". I thought I had included it, but thought wrong. It was the first time I've seen the oysters. They were much whiter when found. Sadly, I was too tired to take out my camera and take pictures at location. Wasn't sure if it was the edible oysters or poison look alikes. I just took a few samples to study it. I look forward to fall to see what else I find. Hopefully I will come across the Hypsizygus.
     
  4. 4ager

    4ager Active Member

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    Frog, would these be in the same? don't know if you can see the spore print, but one of them with the moss smells very oystery. They've been sitting on my counter for a few days now.
     

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