How to train climbers

Discussion in 'Vines and Climbers' started by bcgift52, Mar 15, 2006.

  1. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    I would like to train some vines to climb a couple of cedars and would appreciate some
    advice on how to do this. The trees have been limbed about 10 feet so how do you get them between the ground and the branches ?
     
  2. globalist1789

    globalist1789 Active Member

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    Hi,

    The vines you get need to be climbing vines as opposed to trailing vines. Climbing vines have special structures on them for gripping things (like trees in this case) as they grow upwards. Ask at the nursery/garden shop, they should know which vines will work for you. There isnt a lot of training required as what because what you want them to do is just their natural growth pattern. You can train trailing vines up fences using wires and such, but for your trees I think that natural climbers are the ticket.

    Michael
     
  3. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    I have a Paul's Himalayan Musk Rose and a clematis montana wilsonii, and c.montana Mayleen which are all supposed to do very well climbing on trees. I think once they
    reach the branches of the trees they "climb" on their own. I can't figure out how to
    get them to the branches. Should I throw electrical wire up and over the branches
    and find some way of anchoring the ends to the ground ? I'm assuming that the initial help will have to be strong enough to last at least a few years till the vines reach the
    branches.
     
  4. globalist1789

    globalist1789 Active Member

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    I don't know the habits of those particular plants, but a good climber should hold on for itself. You could use some string to tie it to the trunk of the tree temporarily until it grabs hold. If they are vines that are good for on trees then they should grow straight up the tree once they have latched on. They should need a lot of training or other support.
     
  5. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    Thank you for your help globalist and I still have time to work on it since I haven't
    yet planted them in the ground so I guess that should be my next step.
     
  6. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    You should grow the climber away from the trunk of the tree. For two climbing roses that I am training up a cedar, I grow the roses at or just outside the drip line. I tie a durable and stout rope to a good sized limb of the tree, stretch it and anchor it to the ground cross to the rose. I then tie the climbing rose up the rope. Once the canes reach the canopy of the tree, it will manage on it's own.

    For a climber which is self anchoring, I have a Clematis armandii growing up the same tree. I use a bamboo pole to provide the initial bridge to the canopy of the tree.
     
  7. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    Do you think I could get away with planting closer to the tree if I arrange for drip watering ? Also I would be planting on the west and south side of the tree so until they get high enough would only afternoon sun be okay ?
     
  8. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    Is there really such a plant (climbing rose) that clings to trees and or lattice?

    Please tell me the name of this self climing rose, I would love to buy one.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2006
  9. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Climbing roses do not climb as such - they scramble up, anchoring themselves with their prickles, just like brambles do. They do not twine and they do not have tendrils. Their hold on the structure is, therefore, not as secure as true climbers. As such they often need help initially. Even when established up a tree, a good windstorm may rip them off the tree. They will then need assistance to be put back up on the tree (I use an old telescoping aluminium pole for this). The only insurance against this happening is to thread the canes in and out of the branches of the tree, or tie the canes to the tree's branches at strategic points.

    The two varieties that I have are Rosa filipes 'Kiftsgate' and 'Treasure Trove'. Treasure Trove has less prickles than Kiftsgate and I find it falling off it's perch more than Kiftsgate does. I take a bit more effort to secure Treasure Trove by tying the major canes into the branches of the tree. Since it is of a height that will soon be beyond the reach of my ladder, I probably won't be able to do much to the new growths beyond this season.
     
  10. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    Ooh, Kiftsgate - that is a nice one too. It is supposed to be the imaginary rose that clambered all over the imaginary 'Sleeping Beauty's' castle. If you plan to join the Lower Mainland spring trade, one of the gals had a Kiftsgate to trade last fall. She might still have it.
     
  11. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Kiftsgate is a beauty. The plant here at UBCBG climbs high onto a tall tree. Lianas are allowed to grow onto trees here. It is quite spactacular when they bloom. I am always perplexed when I see visitors walk right past a tree heavily laden with fruiting kiwi vines or covered almost to the top with clematis or rose blooms. When you visit be sure to LOOK UP! At the base of the Kiftsgate you see this - uniquely beautiful in its own way. We don't have photos of the flowers online. Hard to get a shot of the whole plant.
     
  12. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Wow! That's quite a tangle.

    Here is the specimen growing over the roof of the gift shop at the Royal National Rose Society's Rose garden near St. Alban's.

    kiftsgate.jpg

    And here are the flowers of Treasure Trove. Treasure Trove is probably the result of a chance cross between Kiftsgate and a hybrid tea.

    treasure trove.jpg
     
  13. Gardenfever

    Gardenfever Active Member

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    Hi Bcgift,

    I've got a Paul himalyan musk underneath my cedar tree since last summer. it's thrown out long enough canes in one season to train up to the first branch which is around 8 feet up.

    Lykkefund is under another cedar tree and she has done better actually - though rather unexpectedly. I think it was because she had a sturdier bambee stake to guide her up the tree. She's not wasting energy waving around her canes to find a perch. Lykkefund has thrown out multiple canes that are draping over the bottom tier of cedar branches.

    I'm expecting much from these two this year.

    Karen.
     
  14. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    Eric - I'll be sure to keep a lookout for Kiftsgate when I'm at UBCBG in the summer. It must be a sight.

    Weekend Gardener - you brave soul - I'd be afraid of those two strong ones.

    Gardenfever - that gives me some confidence to put them in the ground. Poor things don't like being in their pots forever. Anyway, that should take care of the cedar in the front but I've got another 55 feet (10 cedars) at the back to find ramblers for. Lykkefund sounds like a good candidate, it's got that 'fragrant' thing going for it which I like so much.
     

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