How to grow Fuschia

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by Paulina, Sep 21, 2007.

  1. Paulina

    Paulina Active Member

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    I have two beautiful hanging baskets with very pretty purple & pink fuschia flowers. If I bring them into the house for the winter will they bloom again next year? Or is there another way to propogate them? They are so very pretty, would hate to waste them. Thanx UBC'ers!
     
  2. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    You should be able to keep them over winter. Find a cool bright spot, keep them moist and see how they do. Take cuttings from them as well and you could have lots for next year.

    http://www.jwjonline.net/fuchsia_cuttings.php
     
  3. Paulina

    Paulina Active Member

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    Thanks so much! It looks SO easy, will see how it goes... Happy Fall!
     
  4. Paulina

    Paulina Active Member

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    Well, my fuschias are still alive after a winter in the house... Now, they are green and not very full. Do I trim them right down and re-po them into fresh soil?
     
  5. johnnyjumpup

    johnnyjumpup Active Member

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    Hi Paulina,

    Congratulations on getting the fuchsia thru the winter. I'm not an expert but this works for me. When it starts to put on new growth prune the plant back to encourage bushy growth and put the cuttings in a glass of water on an east facing windowsill (they will cook in too much sun) and wait for them to develop roots. Then pot them up. They would probably root if you dipped the ends in hormone rooting powder and put them in a cutting medium but I have not tried it.

    I currently have a windowsill full of cuttings some of which have rooted and some that are still thinking about it.

    Good luck.
     
  6. Paulina

    Paulina Active Member

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    Thank you thank you! I wasn't sure what to do with them at this point, they're looking kinda gangly... will see how they do...
     
  7. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years

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    At this time of year, tip cuttings (just the top few leaves and short stem) poked into a pot of moist potting soil and covered with a plastic bag will root readily. When they start to grow, give a gentle tug to see if they've rooted. Then dig them out and put them in individual pots.
     
  8. brigitt graves

    brigitt graves Member

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    thanks for all the fuschia tips, i am going out front and try some of the suggestions, wish me luck! Roseville Fuschia Freak
     
  9. darcy sreebny

    darcy sreebny Member

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    A few weeks ago I bought hardy fuschia plants and hydrangeas in containers, but I would like to plant them into the ground in my backyard. Fuschia bushes grow very well here in London, and these are hardy ones. Hydrangeas are also successful here.

    Anyway, I am American and don't always understand the terms used at nurseries. I believe the term compost refers to the planting soil here. Bags of "compost" are sold here for rhodos and azaleas, and then there is "all-purpose compost" for planting other kinds of plants. Which kind should I use to plant the fuschias in? Also, some bags are labeled peat and others say no peat, but does that mean no real peat and that it contains peat substitute? As for planting conditions, for the last several weeks, the weather has been cool, and both sunny and cloudy. But the air and ground are very dry since it has hardly rained at all. I water every day. Thanks, Darcy
     
  10. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi darcy--if you're planting directly into the ground, perhaps you don't need anything extra in your soil there...depends on how good the earth is in your yard. If you do add some organic amendment, try to mix it into a large area of the planting rather than just a small blob which can cause some problems with watering and root development. Composted manure is one common improvement for soils that are low in organic matter.

    Bags of "compost" like you mentioned would be sold for growing plants in containers, I'm pretty sure...
     
  11. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Compost refers to the good leafy mulchy soil. Ours grow profusly here in the garden in an acidic soil. Maybe that is why they are suggesting different compost for the hydrangeas and fuchsia. As far as I know they prefer the acidic composty leaf mulchy soils full of good organics, as do azaleas rhodos and camelias.

    Liz
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2008
  12. Debby

    Debby Active Member 10 Years

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    I'm just now noticing the misspelling. Correct spelling is fuchsia, named for Leonhart Fuchs. His name, according to Wikipedia, is sometimes spelled Leonhard Fuchs (but not Fusch).
     

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