How to get rid of Cabbage Palm Trees

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by georgia, May 8, 2008.

  1. georgia

    georgia Member

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    I live in an area where early leaders went crazy planting cabbage palm trees. For some reason (which I can't see) they thought they were wonderful and lined many streets with the trees. As anyone familiar with the cabbage palm well knows, they have now taken over. They are every where.

    I really dislike them - I don't find them all that attractive. They don't provide shade, food, or flowers. They house rodents and roaches. And every time it rains or is windy my yard is a mess.

    The birds and racoons eat the berries and then the seeds are carried to other parts of my yard. The trees grow every where: in my azalea beds, in the confederate jasmine, in the cracks in the side walk.

    I cut the new growth down whenever I can (it is practically a full time job) but they just keep growing back.

    Can someone please tell me how to get rid of these awful trees.
     
  2. skeeterbug

    skeeterbug Active Member

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    You have to chop the roots out with an axe--only solution I have found-- you can eat the heart when you do if you like palm hearts.
     
  3. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Send me a few. I'll take 'em off your hands.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  4. georgia

    georgia Member

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    You say you want them but believe me you don't. Cabbage Palm Trees are the home of roaches and rodents. The birds and raccoons eat the berries and carry them all over your yard. New Palms grow from these "transplanted" seeds in your flower beds, hedge, the cracks in your sidewalk and at the base of your house. I must cut down a minimum of 30 new growths a year - not including those that the lawn mower takes care of for me. I would never advise anyone to plant a cabbage palm tree - unless you really do live at the beach and nothing else will grow there.

    None of the cabbage palms in my yard would be there if the county hadn't lined the street that the enterance to my subdivision is on with cabbage palms. It is from these cabbage palms that line the main road that all of my cabbage palms have come (over the years). Maybe I should call the county and tell them to come get 'em out of my yard - but I don't think that would get me very far!

    Have a superb day!
     
  5. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    The cabbage palm (Sabal palmetto) is native to much of the south eastern USA, so whether or not the county or city planted these palms, they'd likely be poping up anyway. Both the states of Florida and South Carolina have adopted these palms and are designated as their offical state trees. They've been seen on license plates from South Carolina to celebrate the State tree.
     

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  6. georgia

    georgia Member

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    I knew the palm was the state tree for South Carolina and now (thanks too you - I mean this kindly) I am aware that it is the state tree of Florida...so I guess that is my real problem I live nestled between sc and fl in good ole ga. The palms had to meet in the middle I guess.

    Also, I am very well aware of the fact that the cabbage palm is native to coastal georgia however I disagree with you. If the trees hadn't been planted all over my city/county to line many of the streets I do not think they would be taking over my yard right now.

    ttfn!
     
  7. DC United Palm Fan

    DC United Palm Fan Member

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    Seriously, I would pay the postage if you were to dig up a few seedlings, and bare root ship them to me, along with a bunch of seeds!

    Cabbage Palmettos are one of my favorite trees / palms.

    Many palms house rodents/roaches...etc. If you think Sabal Palmetto's are bad, be glad you do not live in an area where there are any Washingtonia's, Mexican Fan Palms...etc, espeicaly ones with "skirts" of dead leaves.

    You live in an area where Sabal Palmettos are native. People from SE NC, on down have these native trees, and I rarely hear of any problems stemming from them. They can even be found as far north as VA Beach/Norflok/Suffolk/hampton VA. While not native there, they are fairly widely planted, and with some winter protection do just fine there. Maybe de-boot them and try to keep them as clean as possible, and that alone should cut down on some of the "pests".

    If you don't want all the seeds, well, you can prevent this by getting up there and cutting off the inflouresence before it goes to seed. Just some suggestions.

    ... And I wasnt kidding, I would LOVE to have some seedlings and seeds!
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2008
  8. smivies

    smivies Active Member

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    Somewhat ironic I think, that the tree species you are so determined to remove will be the only one still standing when the inevitable strong hurricane comes ashore. The other trees will become house crushers or spears.
     
  9. georgia

    georgia Member

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    Send me your address. I will try to harvest some of the berries for you. I think they are extremely easy to grow - since they tend to pop up all over the place.
     
  10. DC United Palm Fan

    DC United Palm Fan Member

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    Ok, I will as soon as i can figure out how. this forum does not seem to have "private messages" enabled, but ill try and figure it out. Maybe you have to go into your profile settings and check the box to allow other members to send you email? Ill keep trying to figure out something on my end and if all else fails Ill just post one of my email addresses I dont care about here in the forum. Thanks!!!! =o)
     
  11. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I've bumped you up to the user level where you can send PMs. I think it was just a matter of hours anyway before it was enabled for you.
     
  12. DC United Palm Fan

    DC United Palm Fan Member

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    Hey Thanks Daniel!

    PM sent! =o)
     
  13. wxman

    wxman Member

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    I'm interested in some of those seedlings also.. Any left?
     
  14. Jason33

    Jason33 Member

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    well hey i got plenty of seedlings and seeds if anyone wants? just have to be kind enough to pay postage or send dinero(money). :)
     
  15. wxman

    wxman Member

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    Jason, I'd be interested in some of your seedlings.
     
  16. DC United Palm Fan

    DC United Palm Fan Member

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    Jason, I sure would be too! How do i get postage to ya?
     
  17. Jason33

    Jason33 Member

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  18. DC United Palm Fan

    DC United Palm Fan Member

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    Ok, ill figure out something. Btw.. where exactly are you? Im assuming somewhere in the SE, U.S.?
     
  19. Jason33

    Jason33 Member

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    Florida.
     
  20. DC United Palm Fan

    DC United Palm Fan Member

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    Ahhh.. no wonder you have so many and some you wish to part with! =o)
     
  21. Jason33

    Jason33 Member

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    YES INDEED! there is not one place I look that there is not a cabbage palm growing with little babies all around it. I don't mind them because like you said there are many worse of palms out there. Such as the California fan palm with the skirt of dead leaves behind. I even seen raccoons nest in them.
     
  22. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    They'd be there whether or not the Washingtonia palms where there or not.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  23. Jason33

    Jason33 Member

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    What? i guess you have seen the sizes of the skirts Washingtonias leaves. Here are some pictures.
     

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  24. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Yes ... but racoons would be present in the environment whether or not the Washingtonia palms where around or not.
    I don't think Washingtonia are solely responsable for the increase or sustainability in local racoon population. They'd nest in a gutter if need be.

    Cheers, LPN.
     
  25. Jason33

    Jason33 Member

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    oh i see. We were just on wrong pages mate. I know raccoons are pretty much every where. What i was referring to was the fact that a cabbage palm is much more rodent free then a washingtonia left with its dead leaves. :)
     

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