How to cover a pergola...

Discussion in 'Vines and Climbers' started by Paulina, Apr 25, 2006.

  1. Paulina

    Paulina Active Member

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    Upper Fraser Valley, Beautiful British Columbia!
    My hubby and I are going to be building a pergola this weekend for the back yard. I've been spending money on countless awnings to protect my daycare kiddies from the harsh sun, but the harsh winds have gotten the best of our awnings each year.

    I'm looking for ideas on flowering vines (non-poisonous to children of course).

    Wisteria seeds and pods are toxic to children, any ideas on the honeysuckle vine?? I'm getting mixed messages in my cyber-searches here.

    Also, a fast growing evergreen vine would be awesome! Any ideas on which evergreen vine would do well in full sun?

    This is what I have in mind, the picture with the 7000 on it... and for those who don't know what a pergola is... I didn't know 'til a few days ago... thought it was an arbour...
     

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  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Grapes aren't evergreen but would be great for kids.
     
  3. Paulina

    Paulina Active Member

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    Strange, I did think of that one, but my neighbour lady told me the grapes attract rats and she says it doesn't look pretty in the winter... I might go for it anyways, it'll be in the open yard and if the rats have nowhere to hide, it should be fine.
     
  4. silver_creek

    silver_creek Active Member

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    Try Akebia quinata- if you plant both the pale or white flowered with the deep purple flowered one (chocolate vine) you will get bizarre but slightly edible fruit in the fall. They are vigorous and semi-evergreen in mild winters. Their flowers are quite sweet smelling (but do attract bees if that is a concern) and bloom in late April. You don't say how far up the Fraser Valley you are- evergreen clematis might not be hardy enough for you.
     

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