Invasives: How does this work?

Discussion in 'Plants: Conservation' started by Chungii V, Dec 10, 2008.

  1. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    Hi all,
    Getting away a bit from id for a change and putting forward a question that has concerned me for a while. It's regarding the declaration of either noxious or weed species. I am not sure how it works overseas but here in Australia if a plant has become a declared weed nurseries are obviously notified. This is where it gets strange: the nurseries are then given a certain period of time to 'clear out' old stock before this is enforced. Does this not just place more of these plants out where they are supposedly trying to stop them ending up??????
    I understand the fact that a Nursery can loose substantial money if it's been investing time and effort into producing something which they then get told they cannot sell. Does this however verify the mindless selling of stock to try and recoup some money. Doesn't this just create a larger problem than what we started with? I guess if the government were to put some form of contribution toward compensation they might save money on having to eradicate a problem plant which has now been spread further by last minute cheap clearance?
     
  2. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I have no idea how it works at all. Here, there are only a few species listed as "noxious" and even then only in restricted areas. (For example, if you have eaten blackberries in the week prior to your planned trip to Galapagos, you'll be delayed an extra 5 days to ensure you're not carrying them with you in your intestines, and of course sale is prohibited on the islands.) I think the difference here is that we don't have a whole lot of Nurseries, just small-scale growers who sell extra plants, so there's no huge loss when the government says "you can't sell this anymore". Equally, some of our native species are invasive in their own territories - it's flood season, so the Water Hyacinths will have taken over the coastal provinces (much to the chagrin of everyone.)

    My opinion: if it's declared a weed, it should immediately stop being sold and the Nursery should destroy the plants at whatever loss. I figure they're at least partially responsible for the spread of whatever, so they should have to cover the loss when it becomes noxious. Any other option just makes the problem worse.
     
  3. Chungii V

    Chungii V Active Member

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    I am interested to hear how others deal with a situation like this because I'm sure our method is a pretty bad approach. It came to my attention at work reading a list of plants in a Horticultural magazine for the industry.
    I do believe that a nurseries responsibilty is to know enough about a plant that they are selling to be aware of the potential to become a problem. I have been amazed at times what we can and can't sell. If a plant has a habit of 'popping up' in unwanted areas that instantly should make them a pest, not neccessarily noxious. (I am sure the definition of a weed is: A plant that is growing where it is not wanted?) One example that quickly comes to mind is Fraxinus griffithii; every year they set bulk seed and readily germinate in the top of pots yet every nursery I've worked has had some in stock. A nursery weeds their plants regularly and should be well aware of problem plants. I really can't see why nurseries would even produce such plants in the first place.
    Jokes about 'Value Plants' because you plant one and end up with many should be taken a little more seriously.
     
  4. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I know that in Canada, all they had to do once it was on the invasive lists was warn consumers that it had the potential to become invasive.
     

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