How do you mark em?

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by bob 2, Feb 12, 2009.

  1. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    I've always have trouble finding a marking pencil/pen that can endure the daily watering and wear and tear on the way from the seeding tray to the garden.
    I loose the info just about when I need to make the final cut.
    What you do folks use to mark your seedlings and transplants?

    Bob
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  3. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

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    I use a "Phano china marker" in white, available at artist's supply stores. Basically a large pencil crayon, don't know what it's made of, but the lettering endures on plastic pots for a couple of seasons, through rain, snow, or W.H.Y. Despite it's durability, you can wipe it off with a rag when you're done.
     
  4. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    I found this document last year while searching for a suitable marker and opted for the Sharpie Industrial as a result. I think the Extra Fine point would be better than the Fine point for plant labels. I used to use a china marker but found the thick point difficult to work with; it was a challenge to write a long botanical name on a medium length label and have it fit.
     
  5. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    Thanks all who took their time to advise me.
    I will give each of these methods a shot to see what works best for me.
    I am also looking at a small labler with a memory like a P-touch. I have a small hobby greenhouse so its not unusual to have 20-30 labels of a kind to print.

    Cheers

    Bob
     
  6. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Bob, you can also go with the engraveable zinc or copper tags sold at Lee Valley (which I used to love when I lived in Edmonchuk) and of course there is always the old standby of 4B pencil on a popsicle stick.
     
  7. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    I seem to be able to wash off the 4B pencils now. Could be the "China" syndrome. m;-)

    How could you up a leave this place? <g>



    Bob
     
  8. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Gee, the -40 weather interspersed with freezing rain might have been factors....
     
  9. bob 2

    bob 2 Active Member

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    LOL!

    That's definitely covers it pretty well.

    Bob
     
  10. growing4it

    growing4it Active Member 10 Years

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    you could try a grease pencil - they are probably available from an art supply store or perhaps a glass painting pencil. I clipped some info from Wikipedia

    "From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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    Two grease pencils.This paper wrapped wax writing tool (also known as a wax pencil, china marker or in the United Kingdom chinagraph pencil) is made of colored hardened wax and is useful for marking on hard, glossy non-porous surfaces such as porcelain, glass, polished stone, plastic, ceramics and other glazed, lacquered or polished surfaces, as well as the glossy paper which is used for photographic printing. It is often used as a construction or handymans marking tool as it rarely scratches the surface it is used on. It may be used to mark a wet surface. Because it is sharpened by pulling a string, it needs no additional tools to remain functional. They are also used as a favorite among some traditional artists.

    This pencil is usually made from non-toxic opaque wax similar to a crayon but stronger. Marks made by grease pencils are resistant to moisture and can usually be removed by rubbing the marked surface with soft, dry paper.

    Grease pencils can be found in many different colors."
     

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