Growing Maples from Seed

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by Victor Hugo, Apr 25, 2006.

  1. Victor Hugo

    Victor Hugo Member

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    Location:
    Mexico, Distrito Federal
    Hi everybody!
    I´m Victor from México, D.F. I´m trying to grow maples from seed (Acer Burgueranum, Acer Palmatum Atropurpureum and Blood Good) but I don´t know if my average temperature it's the right for these species because México don't have any map like the US Hardiness map so I can't tell you the exact zone.

    The only two maps related is the maximal anual average temperature (71.6 ºF) and the minimal anual average temperature (32 ºF)

    The only one of my successful seedlings is the Pinus Thunbergui.

    Greetings from México!
    Sorry, my english it's no so good
     
  2. ginsenghamster

    ginsenghamster Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Fanny Bay, BC Canada
    Hi Victor

    I've grown a great variety of maples from seed and its pretty easy. Since you live in in Mexico City, the best indicator to see if Maples you mentioned can thrive in your climate. Best way is by looking around in the local parks and gardens. If you see some nice established maples, you are in luck. Maples cannot tolerate overly hot or dry sites. Pinus thungerii is drought and heat tolerant so this may not be an good indicator for maples.

    The main requirements for germination: fresh or cold stored seed (a cut test will tell you if the seed lot is good or not). Sow, cover 1/2 inch with fine mulch, keep moist and expose to cold (34-40 F) for 3-4 months then exose to warm temps (50-65 F) for germination. Or you can put seed in moist sand and stratify in the fridge. Never let seed dry out. Check the bag every week or so as you may see seed germinate in the bag (happens often). Then its time to sow in nursery pots and expose to warm temps. Never leave seedlings in full sun.

    Fall colour is dependent on cool temperatures so don't be disappointed if you don't get the bright colours you see in colder climates.

    Red leaf Japanese maples tolerate more sun than green leafed types.

    I hope this helps.

    Happy growing.
    Sandy
     

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