Growing bamboo to replace invasive wild honeysuckle

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Robertnstl, Jan 5, 2007.

  1. Robertnstl

    Robertnstl Member

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    Location:
    St. Louis, Missouri, USA
    Hello. I have a storm water creek which surrounds one side of my property; and I am trying to get rid of the invasive wild honeysuckle that grows on the edge of the creek. Now the area, about 50-60ft long, looks empty and bare. I can see straight down into the creek, which is unattractive. I would like to plant bamboo plants in this location, for the barrier and the privacy.

    Could you tell me what type of bamboo would be the best for me to plant? I want to raise a bamboo privacy fence as quickly as possible. My yard gets a fair amount of shade, due to large trees in the area. Also, I live in the Midwest, St. Louis, Missouri, and the climate here is fairly mild.

    Thank you for any advice and suggestions you can give me. Robertnstl
     
  2. flourish

    flourish Member

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    Be careful as bamboo varieties can be very inasive too.
     
  3. Robertnstl

    Robertnstl Member

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    I need advice on the planting, care and maintenance of bamboo. For example, will bamboo grow well with some shade? How much do I water? Where can I buy bamboo plants, and what should I look for when I purchase them? Thank you!
     
  4. pierrot

    pierrot Active Member 10 Years

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  5. Robertnstl

    Robertnstl Member

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    Pierrot, Thank you very much for the link. This is just what I was looking for, and I found just the information I needed. Also,I was able to find a dealer very close to me, where I may purchase the bamboo. Your kind help is very much appreciated. Robertnstl
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The vines will probably grow over the bamboo if still present after bamboo planted. I have seen golden bamboo almost completely cloaked by giant morning glory (Calystegia) here.
     
  7. petauridae

    petauridae Active Member

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    Location:
    Walla Walla Valley, WA, USA
    Try Lewis Bamboo, they are in Alabama. http://www.lewisbamboo.com/
    Another good site is: The Bamboo Garden (Portland, OR--who I bought from)
    http://www.bamboogarden.com/

    I've talked with reps of both the websites I have recommended and they both were very knowledgable.

    There's a good book that I own called "Ornamental Bamboos" that is written by a professional in the UK. It can be purchased at Amazon.com or at a Barnes & Noble bookseller (online or in a physical store).
     
  8. Robertnstl

    Robertnstl Member

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    Thank you Petauridae, for the very useful information. Lots of good information at both websites. Both websites had good pictures, so I can get a better idea of what I should choose for my particular needs. Thanks again! Robertnstl
     
  9. petauridae

    petauridae Active Member

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    Location:
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    No worrys....I bought Phyllostachys atrovaginata to cover a neighbour's tower of stupidity. It'll take a few years, but nonetheless....
     
  10. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
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    How cold is it why you are? Cold hardiness may be an important factor. You will most likely end up with one of the Phyllostachys. Important information to consider include:
    1. How tall do you want the screen to be?
    2. Are there any natural barriers to stop the bamboo getting out of control itself? Water is an effective barrier against it's spread, but have you considered what you might do to prevent it's unwanted spread into your garden.
    3. How quickly do you want the area covered? Some Phyllostachys are fast spreading, some are slow growing.
    4. How much are you willing to spend?

    You can also ask the same question on Bambooweb. Bamboo is just about the only thing they discuss there.
     
  11. hazel

    hazel Member

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    I am a tad late with this but I want to add it. As someone else said, bamboo is also an invasive plant. If it has not already taken over and/or if you still have a problem with that site, the Missouri Department of Conservation will help you solve your problem. You could give them a call. That is, if you still need help hiding our many "invasive" creeks. They can indeed be rather unattractive. But we do have a goodly number of native Missouri plants that make our creeks quite attractive. Who knows. You might not even want to hide it.
     

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