golden Pothos prop.

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by MOCHA, Aug 25, 2006.

  1. MOCHA

    MOCHA Active Member

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Yakima WA U.S
    I was wondering how well my golen pothos will propagate in water if at all. and if so where should I make the cut. leaf or stem?
    thank you.
     
  2. globalist1789

    globalist1789 Active Member

    Messages:
    790
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver
    You need to cut the stem and bury at least one node (lump where leaf and root nubs are) in soil. Water and put the pot it in a clear plastic bag, like a bread bag, to hold in the humidity. Place it where it will get good, indirect sun light. Wait. These are a VERY easy plant so just cut it, plant it, bag it and it will be fine.

    I never root in water because the roots that form in water are very poorly suited to growing in soil.
     
  3. MOCHA

    MOCHA Active Member

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Yakima WA U.S
    oh cool. Thank you. I didn't know that. Thank again.
     
  4. James D.

    James D. Active Member

    Messages:
    438
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    ottawa,ON. Canada
    you can root the pothos in wateras well, it only takes about 2 weeks and takes up less space than lots of small pots. I put all of my cuting into a shallow square vase and leave it on top of my fridge and in about 2 weelks i have more pothos plants than I know what to do with.
     
  5. MOCHA

    MOCHA Active Member

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Yakima WA U.S
    great! Im going to do that. I have not prop. yet, just been so darn busy. but that sounds easy enough. thanks so much for your helpfull advice.
     
  6. Woodsprite

    Woodsprite Active Member

    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maine, USA
    James D. is also correct about rooting Golden Pothos in water. With this method I turned a sickly looking pothos into five 13" fully formed pothos. What a success! I'm still rooting more, however I don't think I'll keep them all, ha ha!
     
  7. charujp

    charujp Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Japan
    Hello all. I'm new to the boards and found this thread. First of all, I don't have the green thumb. I look at a plant and it dies. I've actually kept my Golden Pothos alive for about 2 years or so now. But I have never trimmed it. I have read on the internet about how to cut it, but I really don't know exactly where to make the cut. I have a picture i'm attaching and like to know if anyone can help me figure out how to and where to cut it.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. charujp

    charujp Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Japan
    ahh well, no answers. I'll just cut it and see what happens. We learn by trial and error, right? hehehe
     
  9. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,512
    Likes Received:
    234
    Location:
    sw USA
    I don't think I would trim that plant at all. It looks nice. But, if you want to, trim off the stems just past the node in such a way that a leaf remains to cover the cut. I think you can trim the stems way back if you want--as long as you leave at least one node, they should form a couple new stems and this would make the plant fuller.
     
  10. charujp

    charujp Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Japan
    Thank you. I'll try that. I just hope that i'll see new growth grow from the area I cut. That part of the plant is just one 'vine' I have at least 4-5 others growing from the same plant.
     
  11. photopro

    photopro Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,455
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Siloam Springs, AR, USA
    Good advice. Just for the record, the plant commonly sold and collected as Golden Pothos or "Devil's Ivy" may not be a pothos. Scientifically it is Epipremnum aureum. But there appears to be some "discussion" among aroid botanists as to what the correct classification may be. Some believe the base genus is Pothos, others disagree. I've exchanged emails with two aroid botanists who differ with the opinion it should be in the genus Pothos. But such is the nature of botany.

    Botanists suspect it is from the Solomon Islands but it was exported by collectors so many years ago it is commonly found at many locations around the world. In warm climates it can easily become invasive. You'll likely learn more about the species by checking it on sites or in texts under the correct scientific name. The plant can become enormous. I have it with leaves well over 18 inches in length. But it does need to climb to attain that size. In my atrium it has reached 17 feet and is still climbing! It is known to reach 40 feet in warm climates.

    Some sites love to scream it is a "deadly poison". It does contain oxalate crystals and can burn your mouth. So it is best not eaten. But most scientific articles will tell you a person would need to eat it in large quantities over a long period of time before it becomes harmful.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2007

Share This Page