Getting slightly confused about cross-pollination

Discussion in 'Plants: Science and Cultivation' started by Sundrop, Dec 4, 2010.

  1. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    I always believed that cross-pollination between varieties affects only seeds produced by the cross-pollinated plant.

    Recently I talked with my neighbour who strongly insisted that when he added another Strawberry variety to his garden his old variety started to change, whole plants, including berries, as a result of cross-pollination. When he got rid of the new variety his old Strawberry plants started to recover and now he has, he said, his old variety looking as before again and the fruit looking and tasting as it originally did.

    It is almost impossible for me to believe that cross-pollination could affect the plant whose flowers got cross-pollinated, but I am thinking, may be it can affect the whole fruit, not only the seed, developing from a cross-pollinated flower?
     
  2. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    The fruit can be affected depending on the source (cultivar etc) of the pollen but the parent plant doesn't change.
     
  3. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Paul.
    “The fruit can be affected depending on the source (cultivar etc) of the pollen”
    Are there any scientific studies supporting and explaining this?
     
  4. DelsJapaneseMaples

    DelsJapaneseMaples Member

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    Maybe it Was the bee's , both varieties flowering, and the bee's crossed the pollen. That could make scene!!!!!!!!!!!!????????????
     

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