Identification: Fungi? I dunno.

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by Bulucanagria, Oct 22, 2009.

  1. Bulucanagria

    Bulucanagria Member

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    I have had these pictures for years and have never been able to identify them. They were found on a friends farm in a wet forested area, growing from a rotted log. To give context, I can say that the same area yields many Indian Pipes every year. I don't specifically remember when the picture was taken. The time stamp on the photo says 12-24-2006. The lack of leaves in the picture support this date but the presence of ferns doesn't, so I can't say definitively. Somehow, Christmas Eve seems too late for such strong growth, especially in central Massachusetts (almost on the NH border).
    I have only found anything similar once and it was decaying and in a different spot. I have not been able to locate my photo of that specimen (someday I'll get completely organized...Hah!) Any information could be of help to me and would be greatly appreciated.
    Thank You
    Bulucanagria
     

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  2. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Hi there B
    They look like Birds Nest fungi: Possible genera include Nidula, Crucibulum, Cyathus.
    cheers,
    frog
     
  3. Bulucanagria

    Bulucanagria Member

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    Thanks. I'll take that and run with it.
    Bulucanagria
     
  4. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    I'm not so sure this is a Bird's Nest fungi?
    Are those full sized tree logs in the first image? Most if not all, Bird's Nest Fungi are fairly tiny...the largest still being smaller around then a dime?
    These LOOK like them, however...but...SIZE! And texture.....all the ones I'm familiar with are lined or hairy.
     
  5. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The largest birds nest fungus I ever saw, and this was unusually large, was an inch tall and a centimeter across. So if your critter is significantly larger than that then yes I agree we should be looking in other directions.
     
  6. C.Wick

    C.Wick Active Member

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    OH wow...do you know what species that was Frog??? I'm jealous! lol
    I've been looking thru all my books and online since looking at this posting.........and still can't find anything significanly large? I know the NE and NW definately has more spectacular species finds then are usually seen here in Kansas.....I might have to move. :o)
     
  7. Frog

    Frog Contributor Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I recall it was Cyathus striatus, not certain, but it was the circumstance that led it to becoming so tall: We were on an exposed high elevation slope, with depressions that had collected especially deep layers of decomposing maple & other leaves. Birds nests on twigs in this litter had attenuated to very tall sizes trying to get to the top of the leaf layer. Interestingly they were each just jam packed with peridioles: We squeezed one at the base and a toothpaste like cylinder of peridioles oozed out the top!
     
  8. Bulucanagria

    Bulucanagria Member

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    Working from memory and familiarity with the area I'd say these specimens are around 2" in diameter and 4" high.
    Bulucanagria
     

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