friendly fungi

Discussion in 'Soils, Fertilizers and Composting' started by Anne Taylor, Mar 3, 2008.

  1. Anne Taylor

    Anne Taylor Active Member 10 Years

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    Victoria B.C.
    I am about to enter the information compost heap to root out the sources of mychorrizal fungus - who likes what and who doesn't. Does anyone out there have a source of 'easy to comprehend' information? And or sources.. other than MYKE.... which is where I would start as a consumer.
    thanks
    Anne
     
  2. growest

    growest Active Member 10 Years

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    Surrey,BC,Canada
    Hi Anne--much information and also opinion on this one...personally I wouldn't dare to make any dogmatic statements after many years of using different myco products in the "backyard nursery" here.

    I can pass on my experience from last spring, trying to source inoculant in Canada. Myke might be the only product being produced for sale here now, not totally sure what happened but probably a registration hassle for American product coming up here. Last year I was able to purchase rather old stock of "Roots" by Novozyme, thru Terralink, Abbotsford, BC.

    If things have changed I'd love to hear about it...my vote would go to a product with a variety of endo species rather than just the single one used in Myke.
     
  3. pinenut

    pinenut Active Member 10 Years

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    Whitehorse, Yukon Zone 0b or 1a
    Re: friendly fungi: next question

    Does mychorrizal fungus have to be specific to the plant, or does one size fit all? (I'm playing with pines here.)
    Carl
     
  4. Anne Taylor

    Anne Taylor Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi Carl,
    Well yes, and therein lies my "need to know". I was keen when I found out about the product for sale,,,, then was informed that some plants need different things. Now this may sound like 'dirt 101'... however I'm learning everyday and enjoying it. It started when discovering the poor transplant rate on mahonia within my property, I was told that bringing as much surrounding earth containing the appropriate michorrizal friends would make a huge difference.
    So appearantly some plants need various fungi, - others need a different one - and some make no appreciable use at all of any.... That's what I want to find out...
    I'm sure someone will know how to access info on friendly fungi for pines.
    Good luck
     
  5. wynn

    wynn Active Member 10 Years

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    Bowen Island
    I used the fungi powder (picked up at the Hort Trade Show) on a transplanted cedar last year (a large one that we moved by excavator and in not very great shape due to poor siting). I didn't have a lot of confidence in the transplant, but I drove by the other day and it looks perfect, no browning or dieback at all. Don't know whether to credit the micorizum (sp?) but I'm pleased that it doing so well. I think I'll continue to use the "tree and shrub" formula for a while and assess the results.

    Wynn
     
  6. pinenut

    pinenut Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi Wynn:
    Have you got a brand name for that stuff?
    Carl
     
  7. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

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    Langley, B.C. Stones throw from old HBC farm.
  8. richardbeasley@comcast.net

    richardbeasley@comcast.net Active Member Maple Society

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    You have got to see the show. Just click the picture: microrize.jpg to go to the UBC tread on Mycorrhizal fungi, and remember George it is all downtown.
     

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