Found rose

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by 1950Greg, Jun 28, 2008.

  1. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Langley, B.C. Stones throw from old HBC farm.
    I posted a question last fall looking for a possible indentity to a spieces rose that looks like R. acicularis and now I have more pictures of the plant and blooms. Also after reading more about R. Nootka and finding that there are four varieties could this be one of them.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jun 28, 2008
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    10,802
    Likes Received:
    191
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    Not sure what it is, but it or a very similar one is commonly used as a rootstock for garden roses over here. Not uncommon to see it in neglected gardens where root suckers have taken over from the cultivar originally planted.
     
  3. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Langley, B.C. Stones throw from old HBC farm.
    That would be most likely R. canina or dog rose which is light pink to white in colour. One thing about this found rose that I noticed right away was the absence of a white centre which sets it apart from the nootka rose which is more common here in the Fraser valley and the west coast. Here is a picture of this found rose with a flower from R. nutkanas in the middle showing the white centre and smaller bloom.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,178
    Likes Received:
    319
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Top right shot does look like 'Hollandica', a Hybrid Rugosa used as rootstock and seen here and there in this region - including a garden near me.

    http://nlbif.eti.uva.nl/bis/flora.php?menuentry=soorten&id=2693

    Other pictures posted on this thread seem to me at this time to show darker, broader petals and larger tufts of stamens relative to the size of the petals than on plants of 'Hollandica' I have seen here and in photos taken elsewhere. A.L. Jacobson once noticed a plant on Restoration Point (near Seattle) that appears to be the result of a crossing of R. nutkana and R. rugosa; several on the highway near Heronswood nursery, Kingston, WA may also be examples of this pairing. Perhaps your find is a third instance.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2008
  5. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Langley, B.C. Stones throw from old HBC farm.
    Thanks Ron, now that I look at some pictures of R. rugosa the flowers look quite similar in there colour and thin petals that tend to flop over. I found some picture on HMF roses of the parent plant to 'Hollandica' Rosa rugosa Thunb. Heres a link for anyone interested http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/pl.php?n=53655&tab=10
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,178
    Likes Received:
    319
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    I found another one of your roses today in Seattle. Since 'Hollandica' was tested and found to have a undetermined musk (Sec. Synstylae) rose species as the other parent, the background of the one you are asking about could also contain a surprise. Meanwhile its morphology would certainly appear to be a combination of Nootka and Rugosa roses characteristics.

    I'll have to show the one in north Seattle to Jacobson sometime and see if he thinks it resembles the one he found on Restoration Point. The one today had decidedly rugose leaves, with rather narrow leaflets and prickly stems - similar to those of 'Hollandica' - but with tall narrow (short-branched) growths and small flowers, in the manner of R. nutkana.
     
  7. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Langley, B.C. Stones throw from old HBC farm.
    I am becoming more convinced that this rose is R.acicularis from further reading in an article by Reah Worrell about rose hips. http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/ezine.php?publicationID=251&js=0Most rose hips are round or ovated in shape as are R. nutkana and R. rugosa. R. acicularis has "shiny, dark red, urn-shaped hips" according to this article and as shown in the photo from last fall of the hips this describes them to a tee. I am not a breeder of roses but it would follow if both parent plants have round or ovate hips how could you end up with urn shaped hips?
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,178
    Likes Received:
    319
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
  9. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Langley, B.C. Stones throw from old HBC farm.
    Wild roses of the same variety often show different traits due enviroment and local. Trying to pinpoint this rose has been difficult. R. acicularis is one rose that is found all across the polar regions and is wide spread throughout N. America. The only really outstanding trait is this glossy red ,urn shaped receptical. These are some of the descritions given at HMF http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/pl.php?n=5251&tab=7
     
  10. GreenLarry

    GreenLarry Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    271
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Darlington, England
    Its not rugosa,the hips are too long. The hips of rugosa are round and more orange,like small tomatoes. Not a dog rose either,flowers are different. Looks like a cross between the 2 actually! I worked at a rose farm(David Austin) and dealt with rootstocks that were 'hairy' like that one.
     
  11. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Langley, B.C. Stones throw from old HBC farm.
    I don't think this rose is rugosa at all it doesn't have that gland smell to the buds or the raised areas between the viens on the leaves. R. acicularis is also called the prickly rose and will cross with a number of wild roses.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 13, 2008

Share This Page