Favourite non-gardening plant books?

Discussion in 'Conversations Forum' started by Daniel Mosquin, Sep 11, 2008.

  1. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Esteemed Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    What's your favourite non-gardening plant book (and why)?

    For myself, it's the Lichens of North America by Brodo and the Sharnoffs. I love the photographs and it does an excellent job showing the diversity of these oft-unnoticed critters. It's also so heavy it makes me feel smarter just by toting it around.
     
  2. togata57

    togata57 Contributor 10 Years

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    I recently discovered "Botany In A Day----The Patterns Method of Plant Identification" by Thomas J. Elpel. It has a logical, simple format, introducing plants by their families and unique characteristics. Good for beginners, and for those with more knowledge as well.
    Also, I frequently consult my Peterson's "Wildflowers". I like the way it is organized by flower color. Works for me!
    Finally, I must mention a small, elderly book that has been my companion for a long, long time. "A Guide To Wild Flowers---Field Flowers" by T.H. Everett, published in 1945.This is the book that first showed me pokeweed and yarrow, and where I learned that those "weeds" in the yard were plantain, and chicory, and Queen-Anne's Lace.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Lugging cumbersome objects around is a sign of intelligence? Then I've done some very smart things in my day.

    The manual or monograph that helps me accurately identify a found plant I am trying to name or resolve some similar question about wild or cultivated plants becomes my favorite for that moment.
     
  4. bjo

    bjo Active Member 10 Years

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    My current favourite is :

    " Flowering Plant Families of the World" by VH Heywood and others (2007) published by the Royal Botanic Garedns, Kew. A review of 506 flowering plant families in 424 pages. Obviously the treatment of each family is a bit synoptic, but it is packed with fascinating information and some great drawings/paintings. It is also great to have such an authoritative book to hand. Since I got it in May, this book has travelled around the house with me - but has never been closed....currently open at the Cistaceae !

    Ciao
    BrianO
     
  5. Katalina25

    Katalina25 New Member

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    I borrowed a book:

    One Hundred Flowers and How they got their Names'.
     
  6. silver_creek

    silver_creek Active Member

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    Pojar and MacKinnon- Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast, and Parish, Coupe, & Lloyd- Plants of Southern Interior British Columbia and the Inland Northwest. I use these extensively to identify plants on our various camping, hiking, and kayaking trips. I have to admit I also use them as gardening books when trying to place native plants in the landscape as well, as the information on ecology often tells me how to please that plant.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2008

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