Fast growing evergreen?

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by kitsap, Feb 10, 2007.

  1. kitsap

    kitsap Member

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    Hello,
    We are so confused and would appreciate any advice! We are looking for fast growing evergreens to provide privacy from the uphill neighbors. Our intent is to create an attractive, natural northwest looking area through the use of shrubs and trees. The area is well drained and sunny.

    Some nurseries and websites note that incense cedar is fast growing but others state that it is not. So we are not sure if this is the right option. Others mention Golden Leland Cypress. Does anyone have any suggestions or advice on this subject?
    Thanks so much!
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Incense cedar is not fast growing. Leyland cypress is not attractive, the most common yellow cultivar 'Castlewellan' in particular can be amazingly homely. Results vary with site but generally this hybrid (Leyland cypress) has a distinctively uninteresting appearance not shared by related conifers.

    If you want it to look naturalistic you could plant local native conifers such as western redcedar or Douglas fir. These are fast growing and certainly suited for local soils and climates. The cedar likes moisture and the fir likes sun. Another popular choice is shore pine (Pinus contorta contorta).
     
  3. Andrzej

    Andrzej Active Member

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    Thuja Exelsa could be a good choice. It grows about 2 ft per year, tolerates shering and is very bushy

    Andrzej
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    The fastest would be Coast Redwood Sequoia sempervirens, Douglas-fir Pseudotsuga menziesii and Grand Fir Abies grandis; all will grow a metre per year or more when young.

    "Thuja exelsa" is a synonym of Thuja plicata (Western Redcedar)
     
  5. Andrzej

    Andrzej Active Member

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    That is correct
    We have one in our backyard

    Andrzej
     
  6. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    We have some leylands, but we have an acre, which we plan to sell. The trees look sharp when they have space, but they are way to big for many smaller lots.

    Our Castlewellan was awesome in Beaverton, the talk of the neighborhood. I'd plant one or two again, but only with space.

    I think that Thuja / "cedar" is a better performer, and I'd take a redwood or giant sequoia over a leyland for our permanent yard; yet to come.

    I like blue atlas cedar, western hemlock and Austrian pine.

    Grand fir has been a bit unpredictable, as have been white pines.
     
  7. Andrzej

    Andrzej Active Member

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    We have a neighboor who has five big Laylands.
    I agree they take a lot of space when they grow up.
     
  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    >"Thuja exelsa" is a synonym of Thuja plicata (Western Redcedar)<

    Reference would be to T. plicata 'Excelsa' and not T. plicata.
     
  9. Andrzej

    Andrzej Active Member

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    Ron,

    You right

    We got one from the BigTree Nursery in Snohomish (Rt 9).
    They are very nice people.
    They have a lot of Thuja P. over there.
     
  10. J.Onstott

    J.Onstott Active Member

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    You have to be careful with Firs as well, they are generally prone to more diseases.
     
  11. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    True firs (Abies) often have disfiguring bug problems in local low-altitude plantings. Douglas-firs (Pseudotsuga) do not.
     
  12. arborist

    arborist Member

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    If they are your uphill neighbors please consider whether or not tall trees in your yard would ruin their view if they have one.

    Deodora Cedars are nice looking and fast growing and would likely do well on your site.
     
  13. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Spellcheck: deodara
     
  14. arborist

    arborist Member

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    Thanks for pointing that out Michael I hadn't realized that was the usual spelling. It seems common to see it written and pronounced that way locally.
     
  15. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    It's always a mistake for deodar.
     
  16. Andrzej

    Andrzej Active Member

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    My thuja plicata grow over 1 ft since we planted last October...
     

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