Eradicating blackberry, ivy, broom and other invasives

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Louis Peterson, May 9, 2010.

  1. Louis Peterson

    Louis Peterson Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lions Bay, British Columbia
    I have heard that a solution of vinegar (concentrated) and salt will kill himalayan blackberry and english ivy when painted or sprayed on the leaves? Is this true? Are there other methods of eradication? What will kill morning glory, broom, chinese lonicera? How bad (or good) is Roundup nowadays?

    Help! Louis.
     
  2. Barbara Lloyd

    Barbara Lloyd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Anacortes, Washington, USA
    If you plan to plant other things in that area ever - don't use salt! Household vinegar works to some extent, but not sure on black berry or the other things you mentioned. Check to see if you can get a higher consentration where you are. Household vinegar is quite diluted.

    Roundup is continually creating their formula to be plant-target specific so check with the people at the the store where you purchase it. barb
     
  3. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

    Messages:
    315
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Langley, B.C. Stones throw from old HBC farm.
    Not sure about broom but I dug one out once and it has a very deep root system. As for Himalayan blackberry and morning glory both do not like cultivation. To eradicate these plants is at least a two year endeavor unless you are prepared to excavate the whole area to remove it and replace with new soil. When I move into the house I'm in now there was a blackberry thicket down two thirds of one side of the yard. The first year we cut them to the ground with a bush mower and the repeatedly mowed it to the ground and dug out and persistent root balls. After mowing them morning glory began to grow in it's place but ninety percent sure didn't like the mowing either. The following year selective use of Roundup took care of the remaining. It is a two year project to eradicate both completely before planting anything new but the soil was excellent with a good layer of mulch. If you decide to use Roundup on the blackberries it's best done in the fall under high pressure when they are going into dormancy so the roundup can be drawn into the root system. Don't plant anything you are not prepared to dig up later until you're positive you have got it all out. Nasty stuff to get rid of.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,199
    Likes Received:
    326
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Pygmy goats.
     
  5. Lysichiton

    Lysichiton Active Member

    Messages:
    707
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Fraser Valley, BC.
    2 good places to start to learn about invasive alien species in BC:

    Invasive plant council of BC: www.invasiveplantcouncilbc.ca
    Greater Vancouver invasive Plant Council: www.gvipc.ca

    In general - Blackberry (Himalayan - Rubus discolor - I assume). Cut it down, then repeatedly weed whack or mow.
    - Ivy (English Ivy - Hedera helix). Cut the stems at their base where they go up trees etc. remove growth on the ground by hand. Pile it in a heap to compost, covering with a tarp or black plastic in the sun. Repeat &/or mow.
    - Broom ( Cytisus scoparius - Scotch Broom). There is a great tool called a puller that will get most bushes out with enough root so they don't regrow. Important! Do this before the seed pods form. The darn things explode everywhere & your problem compounds. If there aren't too many, clip the seed pods off carefully & burn, or put the garbage since they are unlikely to get going in a municpal landfill. Mow.

    or...goats. don't let the goats go wild tho'! They are very destructive if allowed to graze unmanaged. Invite your neighbours to a goat BBQ when the plants are gone. Let me know...I'll be there.

    GVIPC are the experts, or contact your local authorities, since they fight these things too.

    gb
     
  6. Dunc

    Dunc Active Member

    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Port Alberni B.C. Canada
    I cleared in impassible lot of blackberries but, like Greg says it will take 2 years. They seem impervious to all types of chemicals as I tried the lot. You will have to cut them down and then remove the shallow root ball. I dressed like I did in the artic and wadfed in and cut and carried away ops and canes until they were down to 10" stumps. The root ball will easily lift with a pitch fork. For the next few months watch for little root sprouts and rip them out.
    Broom and morning glory are in the same scheme of removal.
    Good luck
     
  7. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    4,777
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    I'm with Ron. A couple of properly tethered hungry Goats, pygmy or full-sized is up to you, are perhaps the best way to eradicate all of those plants completely, without harming the ground. It's what is used on Galapagos to deal with invasions of Castille and native blackberry, morning glory, and ivy.
     

Share This Page