Edgeworthia

Discussion in 'Plants: Nomenclature and Taxonomy' started by Dee M., Mar 21, 2008.

  1. Dee M.

    Dee M. Active Member 10 Years

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    I'm trying to figure out the species. As far as I can tell, Edgeworthia chrysantha is the same as E. papyiflera, with E. chrysantha being the correct name. There are different, mostly unnamed forms of it avaiable, E. papyiflera really being the whiter, less fragrant, less hardy form of E. chyrsantha. Is this correct? Thanks.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    >E. papyiflera really being the whiter, less fragrant, less hardy form of E. chyrsantha<

    There might be a cultivar or unnamed clone being sold as E. papyrifera here but I don't know that all plants for which that name has been used have the same horticultural characteristics. You're asking about a botanical synonym, the range of plants to which it has been applied may be broader than those with the traits you have listed. Read additional descriptions and discussions to find out, looking for how E. papyrifera was defined botanically or for articles discussing the naming of the species in this genus and how they are distinguished.
     
  3. KarinL

    KarinL Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Some discussion here:http://www.npr.org/programs/talkingplants/profiles/edgeworthia.html
    (and other sites - can't find one I previously visited at the moment).
    This piece also refers to E. gardneri, which I bought from Heronswood before the company was sold, and which is also yellow and quite fragrant - and not noticeably different from the chrysantha/papyrifera plant I had prior to that.

    Here is another that is quite unequivocal:
    http://www.plantnames.unimelb.edu.au/Sorting/Edgeworthia.html
     
  4. Dee M.

    Dee M. Active Member 10 Years

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    I have been looking around. Thank you for the links. At the nursery I work at we have two groups of plants, one group labeled Edgeworthia chyrsantha and the other group labeled Edgeworthia papyrifera. From the information I could find out, E. papyrifera is just a synonym for E. chyrsantha, but before I change the name I want to find out for sure what the current thinking is. I don't want to sell any mislabeled plants.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    You may find a cultivar name or other distinguishing name may have come into use for the one type (obtained under the synonym) that you can label your stock with to separate the two groups.
     
  6. Dee M.

    Dee M. Active Member 10 Years

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    I'm still not sure what to do, even after many hours researching. I think I might change the E. papyifera to E. chrysantha (papyifera form). Still I would like any suggestions.
    Here is a link to Daniel Hinkley's website where he and Tony Avent discuss this mixed up group of plants.
    http://www.danielhinkley.com/plant_features.php

    Cistus nursery has offered many forms and species of Edgeworthia also, but I don't feel sure enough to just give them a cultivar name. The E. chrysantha was propagated by Handy nursery in Oregon, and looks a lot like Plant Delight's E. chrysantha 'Snow Cream'. The E. papyifera was grown by Youngblood nursery in Oregon and looks like the one that has been sold by that name, which I know now isn't correct.
     
  7. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Don't make up a name, esp. one using a botanical synonym and mis-calling it a form. If you see these as being different primarily by virtue of flower color label them with what appears to be the correct botanical name and then add something like " - cream" on the end. Preferably you would be able to compare living specimens in flower and determine if yours were, in fact, the same as the cultivar you mentioned - or get background information from Handy - such as where the stock originated - that might indicate to you what it was supposed to be called.

    Mislabeled stock is prevalent in nurseries so you are liable to run into similar questions in future.
     
  8. Dee M.

    Dee M. Active Member 10 Years

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    How about labeling the E. papyrifera, E. chrysantha synonym E. papyrifera? That type of Edgeworthia characteristics are narrower leaves, more branching, shorter, whiter flowers, and less fragrant. I know these are some things I'd want to know about when buying a plant.
     

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