eBay seller...

Discussion in 'Maples' started by ColbyTrio, Feb 28, 2007.

  1. ColbyTrio

    ColbyTrio Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Modesto, CA
  2. TexCedar

    TexCedar Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Texas, United States
    Yes, and wasn't happy with the plant. I would steer you away from buying such a young plant. To me it's worth the money to buy a one gallon or larger plant from an online retailer with a good reputation.

    An inaba shidare from this seller for 20 dollars will be a first year graft on a standard. A few dollars more and you can buy a nice one gallon plant that is probably two years older.
     
  3. chumasero

    chumasero Active Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    sacramento, ca
    Do NOT waste your money and JM passion on ebay.
    I bought one on ebay in the spring of 2005 from a reputable seller (still selling). What I got is an extremely small (6-7 inches tall) plant with extremely weak root system. In fact it was grafted on a one-year-old rootstock. I regret that I did not add $4 - $5 to buy a one-gallon plant from a nursery - a few more dollars would have saved me probably 5 years to watch that tiny thing to grow up.
     
  4. chumasero

    chumasero Active Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    sacramento, ca
    JMs on ebay: the winner always goes to the ebay seller and the post office.
     
  5. benishien

    benishien Active Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    friday harbor, wa usa
    Not all the maples on ebay are bad. There are good nursery's to, some that are on the maple resourse links here on the forum. Always check the seller out before you bid and read the fine print before you buy a one gallon tree for $15 and find out it is 6 inches tall.
     
  6. Andy

    Andy Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lincolnshire UK
    Personally, if I have not seen the plant, I would not buy it, eighteen inches tall means nothing, a newly grafted scion could grow eighteen inches in a season whilst the graft has not properly healed, the thickness of the plant could still only be one quarter of an inch or so, ask to see a photo of the plants they are selling, not a mature specimen as shown in the gallery photo.
     
  7. richardbeasley@comcast.net

    richardbeasley@comcast.net Active Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Piedmont Virginia
    I have bought a lot of trees there, I don't have time to look the sate over for a tree. Yes they are small if you buy a small tree, >they tell you if it is a one year graft, and if they don't it is. The size of the trees are almost always listed so you know what you size to expect. I live in an area that charges outrageous prices for maples. so I have little choice. I have never seen a one gallon maple locally. I have seen many very good grafts from eBay nursery stock. I have never had anyone stonewall me on a question, I think it is a bit more personal dealing eBay. There are only two eBay nurseries that I will not buy from, but even those have replaced the trees that I did not except. Of these two sellers that sent weak trees, and yes I did threaten their children, send new trees right away they don't want the negative feed back, and they get a bit chocked up when you mention there kids. One send two two trees back. I have had my worst problems from non ebay nurseries. I'm joking about the kids, I only talk to there wives that always works especially with contractors,like plumbers or HVAC contractosrs find his wife and your problem are over.
     
  8. Maple_Lady

    Maple_Lady Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    La Center, WA USA
    Hi Richard,

    Thanks for defending some of us ebay sellers, like me - eastforknursery.com. I am a small nursery - no employees and the internet has helped me to survive through winter when typically I have no cash flow. I started listing on ebay to help advertise my website. Gradually, I have added new and rare cultivars to my website. I don't make alot of money on ebay because of all the maple competition and my maples are generally larger so I ask for more money.

    Thank god for the internet and maple forums like this one. Sam 'The Maple Lady'
     
  9. richardbeasley@comcast.net

    richardbeasley@comcast.net Active Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Piedmont Virginia

    I don't know why eBay needs to be defended, yet it does. If you want to buy something you have a score card sitting right in front of you. It tells you exactly how the merchant is treating their customers, not only by the number of positive and negative feedbacks but what each person thoughts on the transaction. How many people would give their local grocery store a 98% satisfaction rate, I sure would not.

    I have made purchase on eBay that came from well known nurseries and some not so well know, and I didn't see dimes worth of difference between the two. At one time I did have an uneasy felling about PayPal, but I found that they can bend the rules when they hear a good argument. I know feel safer shopping on the net especially at eBay and Amazon. I do fine the Garden Watch Dog to be of some help, but not like the info I get from eBay. Their feed back program has been repeated many times on other e-merchants sites which allows for easier buying decisions.

    My last purchase in 2007 was for a Acer Palmatum 'Pink Filigree Lace' find that somewhere else for 25 bucks. As to the prices I don't know how they do it for so little, I don't think I could make a living selling on such a small margin.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2008
  10. amazondoc

    amazondoc Active Member

    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    East TN, USA
    There are a few keys to successfully buying on ebay:

    1. know what to expect BEFORE you buy. Don't expect a huge mature plant if you're paying $10, and READ THE FINE PRINT.

    2. do your research. If you want a specific plant, RESEARCH that plant. Find out what it has sold for before, both on ebay and elsewhere.

    3. check the seller's feedback. There ARE ways to game the system, but you can still get a feeling for the seller by reading the comments that others have left.

    4. be PATIENT. If a specific plant price gets jacked up in a bidding war, LET IT GO. It will almost certainly be offered again, and it may be much cheaper next time. Also refer back to #2 here.

    I have bought a fair number of plants on ebay, and I'm rarely truly disappointed. Do your homework first, and everything will probably be okay. :-)
     
  11. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,424
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    I do feel that people that are members of this forum
    should get some preferential treatment when it comes
    to selling plants to others. The reason why is that they
    are or will be held more accountable for the plants they
    sell. There is a way to get back at them for some of their
    shenanigans should they desire to not keep things on an
    even keel. There will also be some undue criticism they
    may also face due to factors beyond their control as to
    what we do with their plants afterwards. Some of the
    time it is not that we bought a bad plant, we just did
    not know what to do for that Maple once we had it.
    A good way to look at the big picture is ask this
    question: when we see that one 30 year old specimen,
    how many others never made it that far to get that
    old? A lot of one and five gallon Maples never
    made it that far along in years.

    The biggest single responsibility of any eBay seller
    is to tell the prospective buyer the truth when asked
    such, as someone we know asking the seller did they
    graft that plant and never tell us they did and then
    we find out that they had the plant come in as a liner
    from someone we know. If the tree came from Stanley
    & Sons or if the tree came from Buchholz & Buchholz
    then tell people that upfront as it leads to credibility
    of the seller that is offering plants for resale on eBay.

    MountainMaples has some of the same plants I have
    from both Maplewood Nursery and from Henderson
    Gardens. Should they ever tell someone that their
    source plant came from the same source as mine
    and not from some other grower in Oregon then I
    will be happy to be a reference for them. Why? I
    probably know their plant better than they do! The
    problem we have and we've seen it happen is when
    someone will use a photo of an adult or mature plant
    that is not theirs to sell their one year old graft. We
    have no way of knowing if the Yubae they are offering
    is the same as our plant and it is our photo we posted
    in this forum of our tree they are using to try to sell
    their trees online. I can tell you this much that it is
    very doubtful that their source for their one year grafts
    came from the same wholesale source we got our tree
    from in Oregon. Our tree was about a 15 year old tree
    when we brought it in and it has been in the ground
    for 15 years. Who else has one that old? It makes
    sense to use our tree as a foundation to sell others
    but are they the same tree and that none of us know
    for sure.

    You see if someone wanted to sell the Ghosts and
    they can make mention that their plants came from
    Talon then we would give them priority over someone
    that does not tell us who their plants came from.
    Why? We are much more likely to get what we
    are paying for whereas from another source with
    no knowledge of where their plants came from
    we may be buying one thing and getting another.
    I have always felt that we should give bona fide
    sellers that are members of this forum first
    priority when we want a Maple. They will be
    on guard not to mess with us as the power of
    the keystroke can lead to their undoing.

    We've been members of eBay since 1998.
    We've seen even professional sellers get
    zapped by unruly people leaving feedback
    that was totally uncalled for. In this forum
    if the seller makes the same mistake often
    enough or tries not to hold themselves
    accountable for their plants they are
    offering then we have a recourse to let
    others know they may not be a source
    we would want plants from in the future.
    A seller that is a member of this forum
    has to have real backbone and for that
    I give them a lot of credit for sticking
    their necks out while putting their name
    on the line that most anyone can come
    back at.

    There was a California seller that became a
    member of eBay that bought out a friend of
    ours entire fresh grafts and all their one and
    two gallon plants from a source we know very
    well in Central Oregon. All they had to do was
    mention their source for their plants and we
    probably would have made some bids on their
    Maples on eBay. I will say this much that 50%
    of the Maples we bought for people on eBay
    are not what those Maples were represented
    to be, not only that but less than 50% made it
    to the next year for people and thus we stopped
    all of our buying of Maples online a few years
    ago due to people telling us one thing and we
    ended up with quite another, or their plants they
    were selling were guaranteed dead plants when
    we got them due to disease issues. Even from
    sales away from eBay and from direct purchases
    from their personal web sites. Unfortunately,
    this is something we have to learn the hard way
    but it is a good lesson for us and makes some of
    us go back to paying the money for those time
    established five and fifteen gallons again.

    Jim
     
  12. richardbeasley@comcast.net

    richardbeasley@comcast.net Active Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Piedmont Virginia
    Mr Shep is alway right on, however I have had worst luck buying trees other then on eBay and I am running at about fifty fifty. I spoke with a well respected grower just a few days ago and I was told that they were not using a sterile potting mix for which I was shocked. They don't sell on eBay, and to even mention that would be a great big joke to them. However they may compensate for this by only selling trees with a caliber of no less then 2 cm. I almost never bid on eBay with out using a proxy. I just go a warring I am on battery power, I will post my proxy on the maple society forum.
     
  13. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,424
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    I am not saying to others not to buy Maples on
    eBay as there are some plants coming in from
    growers that have been in the nursery business
    for several years and have track records in Maples.
    I am saying, just like us buying antique art glass
    or antique porcelain like we did and have been
    for many years on eBay with many items we
    are rather pleased with, screen the sellers and
    ask them questions about their plant they are
    offering for sale and always ask for a money
    back guarantee. The sellers that will give a
    one year guarantee are the ones to best deal
    with. Any Maple can perish on us soon after
    we get it. If you are not sure of the seller after
    contacting them then check and see if they are
    members of their state association of nurseries.
    If they are not a bona fide nursery then it may
    be wise to stay away from them unless we know
    who they are getting their plants from and are
    willing to roll the dice for that name of Maple
    that we cannot find available through conventional
    sources. Even when we buy the name, we do not
    always get the right plant is the persistent problem
    and many times it is not the sole fault of the seller
    as the plant may have been sold for many years
    by the wrong name. This is why sourcing is so
    important in that we can sometimes trace back
    what the Maple should be at times based on who
    had it and to whom it came from. Several Maples
    were called one thing when people first got them
    and later it was determined that the right name
    for the plant was something else. Those of us
    that have been in the nursery business have seen
    it happen often enough.

    I gave up answering private messages due to others
    asking me about what their Maple is that they just
    bought or to tell them about a seller they got a
    bum steer from. First thing is that you bought
    the plant as is. I have no control over that and
    I will not be put in the position again of being
    someone's authority that I do not know well.
    Secondly, a seller that you got a bad deal from
    may be a seller that I know and like. When you
    bid on eBay you are on your own. Make contact
    with the seller beforehand to better know what
    you will be getting should you win the auction.
    Any person buying antiques will almost always
    ask the seller about the condition of the piece,
    even when stated in the auction, as we know
    that when we look at the piece for sale in a
    different light we may see the crack or the
    chip in the glass or porcelain that severely
    devalues that piece. If we do not ask and
    we get a damaged piece upon arrival then
    who do we have to blame but ourselves for
    not being judicious in finding out beforehand
    what problems there might be. Lots of people
    paid good money for newly made items
    that were supposed to be 100 years old.
    It is not eBay's position, nor it is their
    responsibility to monitor each and every
    transaction but clearcut hoodwinking
    should be administered to. We have
    not ever had it happen to us, so I cannot
    say that marshalling of eBay by eBay is
    necessary. So far they have found it not
    to be imperative for them to do and I
    agree with them. If there was such a
    thing and there should have been, the
    four of us would have been "Power
    Buyers" a long time ago based on
    proceeds that have changed hands
    due to us.

    Jim
     
  14. Poetry to Burn

    Poetry to Burn Active Member

    Messages:
    829
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Philadelphia PA
    Since 2000 I've bought and sold art glass and ceramics eg: Teco, Galle, Longwy, Boche, Fulper, Rookwood etc. With over 500 transactions, a few exceeding 5k, no problems.

    I think I've bought from all of the maple vendors. Like most dealings expect to receive what you've paid for. Ebay is very dynamic There are shady sellers but market forces (savvy ebayers) force them to do business on pricing rather than reputation.


    Between the artwork and maple tree experience I've learned that Ebay is a valuable venue to expand your collecting horizons. Just as in collecting art acquire what interests you from sources you've grown to trust.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2008
  15. Idacer

    Idacer Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Idaho
    I'm not sure there are any guarantees when it comes to japanese maples. I've lost two of the 15-gallon nursery trees in the last two years. Both had been in the ground for about four years. Both died suddenly in the heat of the summer. Both developed bark problems that likely led to their demise. That was a few bucks down the drain.

    Don't get me wrong. I've also lost probably a third or more of the young grafts I've purchased via eBay and other on-line vendors. A lot of these trees will languish for a year or two before they go down. Probably one of the worst experiences I've had was with an advertiser in the Society's newsletter. Complaints about shipping damage (poor packaging) and questionable cultivar identification were simply ignored.

    One of my favorite trees is what I belive to be an Higasa yama that I purchased about three or four years ago from an eBay seller that is still active. It has grown vigorously and is now almost the size of one of those 15-gallon trees when I purchased them. Ironically, I purchased it as a Kashima! Did the eBay vendor blow me off when I emailed her after the tree leafed out? Nope. She sent me another tree of my choice on her dime. Was the second tree really what she claimed it to be? Not sure, but it looks right to me. Did it survive in the long run? So far. Have I lost other trees that I've purchased from her? Had to check my records, but none yet (she's the only internet vendor I can say that about). Would I buy from her again? Sure.
     
  16. kaydye

    kaydye Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Live in Mapleton, Illinois, zone 5
    As with Idacer, I agree. I have lost acers in 5-10 gal containers from reputable nurseries, and I have gotten ebay maples that I have lost. On the other hand, one way to weed out vigorous cultivars from those that are not is to get a small, grafted acer. Some simply take off, even though they are tiny. I'll use Kinran as an example. When I purchased it from ebay, it was about a foot tall with they grafting band still on it. It leafed out and looked healthy and has continued to thrive. In a year or two I'll be able to put it into the ground, but even in a container it looks good. The cost is great for experimentation. But really, as far as supporting maple growers, doesn't everyone spread their buck around? I mean, I have bought from probably 10 different growers (at least). I have also had two bad experiences from growers who advertise in the Maple Soc. magazine. One shipped two trees that looked like they had been just thrown in the box and the other sent a plant that looked dead when I got it, but they would not respond to my email at all. I just recently discovered the Garden Watchdog site (I know, probably everyone knows about it but me). That is kind of a good way to "shop" for mail order growers. Plus, as everyone mentioned, the rating system on ebay is excellent. However, I haven't ordered from ebay for quite awhile because of the biggest problem as someone mentioned above. Time...At age 58, if I buy a one year graft and it thrives, I'll be 68 before it even looks like a tree! HA. So, bottom line, buying a one year graft is a young gardener's game, and I find I'm spending more for a larger tree this year, even if I have to pay higher shipping costs. THere are so many factors that go into buying maples, everyone is different.
    Kay
     
  17. richardbeasley@comcast.net

    richardbeasley@comcast.net Active Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Piedmont Virginia
    I have a system for keeping one year grafts in line. I re-pot them using a lot of sharp sand, drench the roots with Phyton 27 and put them right next to my back door so I don't forget them. I didn't figure this out until late last spring.

    I think the main reason I kill my trees is three fold,

    poorly drained medium,( or the water sat on top of the pot for a few seconds)

    not transitioning them to my climate ( the Sun will fry a maple hear in a hour)

    too much fertilizer or let me say (by using fertilizer.)

    I have found that keeping new arrivals in very filtered shade is important for the fist year or two. I use a 30% aluminum shade cloth on second year stock and it seems to work much better then a 40 to 50 % sun block or the traditionally used shade cloth. I don't have full sun anywhere on my property just direct sun.
     
  18. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,424
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    Now we are talking, based on some of the
    posts above. Many times when we buy five
    or six or more Maples from a grower or from
    a seller, we know from learning this the hard
    way that we will lose some of them. It is the
    ones that we do not lose, that do well for us
    is what makes this a crap shoot that may not
    be all that bad for us. In two years of my
    experiment of buying two year grafts from
    people online I found that some cultivars
    have indeed surprised me, some plants I
    expected to have problems with and others
    have held their own. I am not going to tell
    others not to buy plants this way but it has
    to be known to them that they may have
    some losses from these plants coming in.
    As we become more aware of what these
    plants do for people then we can see by
    looking at the plant whether we really do
    want that Maple or not. Buying on faith
    from a seller does not always pan out for
    us but buying on faith from a seller we
    have a good rapport with does make us
    feel much more comfortable buying from
    them as then it is not a you bought it and
    now it is off my hands but you bought it
    from me and I want that plant to do well
    for you. Essentially we are now into what
    separates the proverbial men from the boys
    in Maples in that it does matter if the person
    that bought that five gallon Crimson Queen
    from a retail nursery for $149.99 loses that
    plant within a year. Heck, it matters if they
    lose the plant five years later. It matters to
    me if they lose the plant 10 years later.

    Anyone can graft these plants and sell them
    as liners to other people but how many of
    those plants ever get up to a five gallon in
    age? Some of us know the percentages based
    on the cultivar and sometimes from who grew
    the plant.

    Every time I was asked to bring in Maples from
    Oregon I was to bring in 5 five gallons of each
    Maple. Why? In case we lost one or two of them.
    If we want to monitor that Maple we have to have
    numbers of plants to do it. One plant generally
    tells us nothing but have 5 five gallons and in
    a couple of years later have several one and two
    year grafts on a uniform, selected, rootstock
    can tell us a lot about that Maple. Then when
    someone asks why is my Geisha or my red form
    of Matsugae throwing out an abundance of
    vigorous leaves that are off color and much
    larger in size than the older leaves are then
    we may have a better idea what to tell him or
    her if we have that Maple and have seen it for
    ourselves in our plants. Not all nurseries bring
    in Maples to sell but bring in Maples to monitor.
    I know of one nursery in particular that never
    tried to sell Higasayama to anyone but did
    propagate Hikasayama instead feeling that the
    industry standard plant was one that had a higher
    degree of mortality for people than the other.
    As it was stated to me, "I can't be selling that
    one plant as it will die on people but the other
    Maple has a much better chance to live in a
    landscape". The same reasoning why Filigree
    was not ever sold by that nursery but Silver
    Lace was after a period of years of cleaning,
    freeing, that Maple up from Verticillium
    alboatrum
    before it was released to people.

    Jim
     
  19. Maple_Lady

    Maple_Lady Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    La Center, WA USA
    Hi, I too sell maples via my website and ebay. I have heard good things for the most part of Cal Maples. They are a little more expensive than I am, but they do offer a wider selection of Acer cultivars. Sam eastforknursery.com
     
  20. Maple_Lady

    Maple_Lady Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    La Center, WA USA
    Quote from Mr. Shep "You see if someone wanted to sell the Ghosts and
    they can make mention that their plants came from
    Talon then we would give them priority over someone
    that does not tell us who their plants came from.
    Why? We are much more likely to get what we
    are paying for whereas from another source with
    no knowledge of where their plants came from
    we may be buying one thing and getting another.
    I have always felt that we should give bona fide
    sellers that are members of this forum first
    priority when we want a Maple. They will be
    on guard not to mess with us as the power of
    the keystroke can lead to their undoing". Thank you for saying exactly what I think.
    I am a small grower of rare and unusual cultivars and Talon is my source. His quality and reputation is without question. I am a one woman operation with arthritis in my hands so I cannot do my own grafting, although LOL I still try.

    I am offering a 15% or more discount to members of this forum. I guarantee that my maples will arrive in great shape or I will replace the maple or refund the money. I offer a replacement maple for only shipping if one of mine dies within 6 months and 50% off to replace any maple that did not survive after that period. I provide planting and care instructions in writing. I use only a sterile potting mix with a root drench of Python 27, plus I add Micorrhizal beneficial fungi innoculation for strong roots.

    I stake each maple when it is potted into a one gallon container and restake and prune yearly to have the best shapped maple possible. Last year I was running low on maples in larger size containers so I visited several wholesale nurseries to buy some. What I found was ugly, misshappen and blemished maples that I could not purchase because I would not resell that maple to anyone using my name. I don't want to be the biggest, but I want to offer the best maple for the best price. Thanks, Sam
     
  21. richardbeasley@comcast.net

    richardbeasley@comcast.net Active Member Maple Society

    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Piedmont Virginia
    Well this is a good little conversation going here.

    I think the big unknown is the quality of the rootstock. How do we know if it has been selected with the particular traits that makes for a strong tree. How many go to this level of expertises to product the most important part of a tree, it's roots.

    Is it not possible that any tree, plant or what have you, that was born in your neighborhood will do a lot better then one that was born on the other side of the world in a climate that is so foreign as some in CA.

    Take San Joaquin Valley, or Sacramento Valley in California, how odd of a climate it that compared to the rest of the county. It is hot and dry in the summer, very wet and chilly in the the winter. However The Big Valley is nice and cool at night, and I bet that is why it can sustain such a broad range of agriculture pursuits, be it sweet fruits olives or even maples.
    You can not beat that Modesto CA olive oil, especially when it comes right out of the press. The night time temp in the Piedmont where I live, do not always drop low enough to allow the tree to recover from the days heat, this is one big reason why we have failures. But if a tree is grown from seed here, it will adjust much quicker then one that is imported, especially a second generation tree.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2008
  22. amazondoc

    amazondoc Active Member

    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    East TN, USA
    Hey all --

    Since we are talking ebay sellers, I will mention that I just received 3 maples from houseofmaples on ebay. All were advertised to be in the 8-12" range. two of them are within this range; the third, Oridono Nishiki, is actually about 2-3 feet tall. The trees were packed securely, in their pots. The seller responded quickly and in a helpful manner to email questions. So far, I'm quite satisfied with the transactions.

    In case you're wondering, I purchased Oridono Nishiki, Aka shigitatsu sawa, and Purple Ghost. :-)

    I'm about to get a few more maples from jherter. I'll report back on those when they arrive.
     
  23. Poetry to Burn

    Poetry to Burn Active Member

    Messages:
    829
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Philadelphia PA
    Whoa, there has been plenty of JM action on Ebay this week. Acer japonicum, 'Fairy Lights' one year graft $41! Year old Japonicum 'Giant moon' $29, 2 year Japonicum 'Aka omote' $20, an Acer buergerianum 'Mino yatsubusa' is $36 with 4 hours left in the auction. Seems like lots of activity for January. Definitely more dynamic than paging through the catalogs ... not recommended for the compulsive.
     
  24. amazondoc

    amazondoc Active Member

    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    East TN, USA
    Yeah, two plants I wanted -- one year Toyoma Nishiki and one year Esk(imo) Sunset -- each went for about $20 this week. Boo hiss. These biddig idjits just run the price up and ruin it for us poor little snipers! ;-)

    Incidentally, I have now purchased Goshiki kotohime and Ukigumo from jherter. I'll report back on how they look once I get em.
     
  25. Maple_Lady

    Maple_Lady Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    215
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    La Center, WA USA
    Ebay has done a good job of programming people to win a bid, rather than buy. I have seen some crazy bidding on not so special JMs. Whereas, I do offer some maples on Ebay, I do so advertise my website. I would rather deal directly with another maple-lover, as a collegue and hopefully a future friend. Ebay has given wholesale nurseries the ability to sell recent grafts for 2 to 3 times what they would normally get.

    This is not why I am on Ebay, although I have had to tailor my items to fit into the 4" pot feeding frenzy. To be competitive on one level I take a 2 year 1 gallon and remove most of the potting mix and package the root system in a plastic bag for shipping Via Priority Mail. I do not like this method, but many ebayers are obsessed with low shipping costs. Being from Washington State, my shipping costs to the east coast are higher than most, but I think my repeat customers don't mind.

    Even though ebay rewards quick sales with records of shipping and feedback, I offer my ebay customers with the option of having me hold they maples until spring. I have to mark the item shipped, per ebay standards, but I advise my customers to wait until they get their maples before posting their feedback. I am not worried about negative feedback and I haven't had any so far. I offer to replace or refund money if the maple arrives in unsatisfactory condition.

    As I sit and explain my philosophy in this digital age I really wonder if I am a dinosaur in a techno-world. Maybe I am, but I still get thrilled to get a call or email from another maple lover somewhere in the U.S. who shares the same joy and excitement I do when spring comes and our babies leaf out in wonder.

    Still offering a 15% discount to UBC Maple forum members. Thanks and keep the comments coming. Sam
     

Share This Page