eating mango seed

Discussion in 'Fruit and Nut Trees' started by RPBnimrod, Mar 9, 2009.

  1. RPBnimrod

    RPBnimrod Active Member

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    I've heard that eating mango seed is safe from many sources, so I decided to try it tonight. The thing is, it was so bitter that I had to spit it out, thinking that the sources that I used could have been wrong. I mean this had to be one of the most bitter things that I have ever tasted. I then looked into half of the seed, and it was grey insede. Could this have been a fungus that did this? Sorry if this is the wrong forum group to ask, but I couldn't think of a better one to ask. Maybe there should be a culinary page, just saying.
     
  2. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    I have experimented with mango stones, and every one that I had cut, was moldy inside... the immature stones from freshly picked sources may be the answer that you are looking for... mango powder is used in some culinary dishes.... best to eat just the sweet flesh of the fruit...
     
  3. theresia

    theresia Member

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    i live in indonesia, where mango is abundant here.
    we never try mango seed.
    and i never heard people suggest it.

    jack fruit seed is better. after u boil it, u can eat it. it taste good.
     
  4. Thean

    Thean Active Member 10 Years

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    Howdy RPGnimrod,
    Mangoes belong to the same family as Cashewnuts and Pistachio nuts and the Poison Ivy too. Some parts of members of this family produce very corrosive juices and must be treated with respect. However, when properly treated they produce delicious nuts. Take Cashewnut as an example, I won't extract the nut from the seed because the shell contains juices that will burn through the skin. I don't care for raw nuts freshly extracted nuts either. But once baked and lightly salted, I just cannot keep my hands off. I don't know if the same thing applies to mango seeds. Until someone can clarify this, enjoy the the meat and discard the seed.
    Peace
    Thean
     
  5. et2007

    et2007 Active Member

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    Hi Thean,
    Vietnamese eating young mango leaves but I never heard eating mango seed. Have you ever eat bitter melon?
     
  6. Thean

    Thean Active Member 10 Years

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    Howdy ET2007,
    Yes, I eat bitter melon quite frequently. People eat the leaves too but I have never tried it.
    I know there are people who eat very young mango and cashewnut leaves. They must be harvested when the leaves are still reddish brown in color. They give a biting sensation to the lips. Where I came from, rural folks are fond of shredding young cashewnut leaves onto Laksa (a spicy and sour dish of fish soup with rice noodles). They even use the leaves in salad. These rural folks have an interesting way to extract the cashew nuts without getting 'burn' by the caustic juice. They seed the seeds deeply so that when they germinate, only the cotyledons emerge from the ground. They then harvest that for eating. Tried that too but still prefer roasted cashews lightly salted.
    Peace
    Thean
     
  7. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    If you extract the seed of a young, unripe mango and roast it (the same way you would a cashew) it becomes a tasty snack. Not common practise all over Ecuador, but in the jungle communities especially the roasted seed is seen as a good source of protein. Eating them raw is too bitter!
     
  8. theresia

    theresia Member

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    dear Lorax,
    did that kind of unripe mango seed, that can be roast and taste good, can be apply to all type of mango?
    or, do we have to find out some kind mango that can be roast and become a good snack.?

    by the way,
    about eat young leaves mango , it taste like usual vegetable, but the very young mango leaves.
     
  9. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I don't think variety is important! We have 7-8 cultivars down here, and all of them are used in the same way when it comes to eating the seed. Raw green mango flesh is very good with salt, and roadside vendors sell little bags of slices throughout the mango season - and then these same vendors sell roasted seeds after they've accumulated enough pits to make it a good commercial venture.
     
  10. Thean

    Thean Active Member 10 Years

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    Howdy Lorax,
    Thanks for the infor. Up here in Canada, mango is rather seasonal. Shall try roasting the seed the next time. Most of the mangoes we get come from Mexico.
    We eat young green mangoes too, (here they are only available only in Vietnamese grocery stores for an arm and leg). But instead of salt, we mix a sauce consisting of shrimp paste (shrimps and small fish mixed with water and boiled till it's a concentrated black thick paste), hoisin sauce, hot chili sauce, roasted sesame seed, finely ground roasted peanuts and sugar. Beside mango we also add jicama, cucumber and hard tofu or any hard and crunchy fruits that we can get our hands on. We call this rojak.
    Peace
    Thean
     
  11. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I would give vital body parts to get fish sauce or shrimp paste here... I miss Vietnamese cooking - Thang 'Long restaurant used to be one of my faves in the city, and of course what month would be complete without Pagolac?

    As is, the traditional South American take on green mango is salt and powdered chili pepper - not too different from Asia, really - and we usually throw in an odd-shaped fruit called a Grosella, which is similar to a gooseberry but bumpy and much tarter.

    I wasn't a big fan of green mango until I moved away from Edmonton - they're so much better when they're fresh off the tree (and don't cost $2 each)!
     

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