East Coast

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Kaitain4, Oct 30, 2012.

  1. jacquot

    jacquot Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    Larchmont Z7, NY, USA
    Yes, heartbreaking. We got less snow, and I only lost a side branch from my Katsura. Trees were bent low, but I was lucky. This snow did not release at all. Many years ago when I was getting started, I had bought a Shishigashira that branched low into three trunks. We had a snow like this and one of the larger ones just sheared off. I've been working on it over the years, and it is starting to look decent again now. Actually it was visiting you that had me see that challenged trees could be nursed back.
     
  2. ndynslvr

    ndynslvr Member

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    Location:
    Tallahassee, Florida, United States of America
    What do you guys mean by dissectum weeping types being more prone to snow damage? If the tree is grafted low, weeping types ought to do well.
     
  3. alex66

    alex66 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    ROME Italy zone9/b
    :-( no word
     
  4. dangerine49

    dangerine49 Active Member

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    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I just saw this post going through the archives. I wasn't a member here when Hurricane Sandy hit and only recently joined. We are on the South Shore of Long Island close to the water and were hit hard by Sandy: One basement room of my home was flooded with 3 ft. of water and sewer backup, two of my cars were destroyed by the salt water and most of my trees and shrubs died from the salt water flooding.

    The only plants that survived were a couple of hollies, some yews, some junipers, boxwoods and euonymus in a raised bed, an azalea, and a lot of ivy and weeds. It took three years but a 50 ft. pine finally succumbed last year. I finally had the pine and the rest of the dead skeletons, ivy and weeds removed and I started re-landscaping last spring.

    The good news is that I never had any Japanese maples before and a friend offered to buy me one to add to my new project. He sent me a Peaches and Cream in September and my new addiction was born. I now have 10 JM's (3 in ground so far) and three more on the way.
     
  5. Geezer840

    Geezer840 Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Snohomish, WA
    Well, you caught the bug. You need to be warned that it is something that few people get over. Welcome.
     
  6. Atapi

    Atapi Active Member

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    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    Quick question about tonight snow storm that hits the East coast tonight and tomorrow. We have some JMs (on pots) just about to open their buds this week, should we take them inside or where the snow will not hit them?. We heard it will be a kind of wet snow this time. thanks
     
  7. emery

    emery Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Location:
    Normandie, France
    Most people I know in the Eastern US are trying to get the pots inside, yes.
     
  8. dangerine49

    dangerine49 Active Member

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    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    I've got five JM's in pots along with some other plants and potted bulbs in an unheated garage. I've been waffling on bringing some outside, but this winter has been a real roller coaster. It's been going from the 60's to the 20's on a regular basis. The buds on the JM's are not popping yet, but my flower bulbs are shooting up like crazy. I'm leaving everything in the garage until at least St. Patrick's Day.
     
  9. chimera

    chimera Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    Fraser Valley, B.C. ,Canada
    Heavy wet snow can also break branches and split trunks on landscape grown maples.
     

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