Drooping rhododendron leaves

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Geneviève, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. Geneviève

    Geneviève Member

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    Sunshine Coast, BC, canada
    After we cut large conifers which shaded a 30 year old rhododendron, this one became exposed to morning and mid day Sunlight instead Of just afternoon sun.

    It hardly set any new leaf, and no bud, and leaves are drooping. We made a frame and draped large sheet do N-sulate, a permeable fabric, and after 2 days, leaves look the same. I have watered the leaves, and the soil.
    Any suggestion?
     
  2. lainyg

    lainyg Active Member

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    It sounds like it's getting too much sun. I had to transplant a rhodo a few weeks back and was warned of the possibility of cooking the roots if I moved it to a sunnier spot. I was able to find an spot with similar sun exposure and it seems to be doing well.

    I'm no expert, but from what I have learned here, I would suggest mulching it really well to try to prevent the roots from being baked by the hot sun we're getting. Then I would look for a long term solution to getting it back in the shade.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Yes, the heating of the root zone is probably counteracting the watering - if the watering was a good soaking. Otherwise, maybe it needs more water.

    If you don't keep the roots cool it may get root rot and fail even if watered, it wants the root zone to be both cool and moist. If there is no mulch on the root area you will definitely want to put some down. Keep it off the stems. Arborist wood chips/play area chips are best for trees and shrubs - which should be kept mulched at all times, except where an adequate natural accumulation of plant litter is being retained.
     
  4. Geneviève

    Geneviève Member

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    Thank you!
    We have a lot of cedar and fir mulch from the trees we cut.
    I just put some on the roots. How much is enough? 10 cm? 20?
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    4" is good, as long as there is not a thick layer placed near the stems which then ends up covering them.
     

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