Do leaves really always have an axillary bud at the base?

Discussion in 'Plants: Science and Cultivation' started by VVD, Dec 17, 2020.

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  1. VVD

    VVD New Member

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    Would love some clarification: We're taught that you can tell a leaf by the axillary bud where the petiole connects to the stem. But what if the axillary bud has developed into a stem/branch?... Will there be no more axillary bud? Would it be correct to say that leaves quite often lack axillary buds at their junction with the stem (maybe one used to be there, but later developed into a stem/branch)?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Sulev

    Sulev Active Member

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    Last edited: Dec 17, 2020
  3. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Looking for a bud at the base of a petiole is a useful way to determine whether a leaf is compound or simple. If the axillary bud has developed into a stem/branch, then in succeeding years, it is unlikely a leaf will form at that specific node (at least for seasonally deciduous plants). For evergreen broadleafs... hmm, I'll have to go take a look.

    Also, there are times when examining a leaf that a bud isn't evident at the base of the petiole -- it could very well be hidden within the stem (like in Actinidia).
     

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