Invasives: depth of english ivy / morning glory roots

Discussion in 'Plants: Conservation' started by ElaineTaylor, Aug 25, 2009.

  1. ElaineTaylor

    ElaineTaylor Member

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    vancouver BC Canada
    good evening

    we have a back yard covered in ivy / morning glory. I am willing to pull it out by hand, but this will be a waste of time unless I can isolate our yard from the neighbor's lush weed patches.

    We are going to build a fence with a cement pony wall as the base. how deep do I need to make the cement foundation to stop the neighbors weed roots (especially morning glory) from re-colonizing my yard from under the fence?

    thanks, elaine
     
  2. kaspian

    kaspian Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    459
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Maine coast, USA, zone 5
    Ivy becomes a deep-rooted plant. Morning glory -- if we're talking about the annual climber -- not so much.

    I don't think you need to worry about either of these plants spreading by the roots under the wall. Since they are climbers, their stems grow rampantly and spread about, and ivy will put down new roots wherever its stems find a hospitable terrain, but the existing roots just stay put and grow deeper. So once you get these plants properly whacked into place, all you need to do is clip off any errant shoots that come your way.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,351
    Likes Received:
    386
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Teams clearing ivy (Hedera hibernica is the worst) out of Seattle public lands are with some effort able to roll it up like a mat. The prevalent nuisance morning glory in this region is Calystegia silvatica, a vining perennial with penetrating roots that snap off when pulled, leaving sections from which it rebounds. This won't, of course come through intact concrete - but a barrier may have to be at least a foot deep to keep it out, I suppose. Since both plants climb these are also able to come through or under a wood fence - anywhere there is a space between boards or boards and concrete. The ivy can even stick to the fence, cover its entire surface in time. If the ivy is not kept off the neighbor's side of the fence by them you will have to arrange to go over and beat it back perhaps every year.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    10,904
    Likes Received:
    229
    Location:
    Britain zone 8/9
    That's a bindweed, not a morning glory!
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

    Messages:
    20,351
    Likes Received:
    386
    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Giant Morning-glory or Bindweed. Great, Hedge or Larger Bindweed. Bell Bind. Rutland Beauty. Lady's nightcap. Pisspot. Devil's Vine. Hellweed.
     

Share This Page