Datura or Angel Trumpet

Discussion in 'Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest' started by Miry, Feb 23, 2015.

  1. Miry

    Miry Member

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    Does anybody have ideas on how to winter daturas by leaving them in the ground?

    I put mine in the garage after cutting them back and have just brought them out. I repotted and put them in a sunny area. They are growing like crazy.

    I would really prefer to leave them outside all winter as the pots are so heavy and it is hard for me to manage.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2015
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    (moved post from forum announcements to outdoor gardening in the pnw -- second thread in a row)
     
  3. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    What variety/cultivar do you have? Different varieties may have different cold hardiness.
    And be careful when handling because Daturas are highly poisonous.
     
  4. Eric La Fountaine

    Eric La Fountaine Contributor UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I don't think overwintering Brugmansias outdoors in ground works too well in the area. I have seen a few yards where people overwinter them. There seems to be one type that survives OK around here, with protection. It is kind of a salmon pink colour.

    Brugmansias grow quickly from cuttings, so simpler way to grow them, might be to take several cuttings in the fall and grow those indoors. They should be a good size for planting out in the spring and will likely grow better than overwintered plants.
     
  5. Miry

    Miry Member

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    Thanks for the input.

    I'm sorry but I don't know the variety I have.

    I brought them in from the garage and they are doing well but it is quite a job because the pot is so big.

    This was such a beautiful plant last year.

    See attached picture from last year and how it is right now in my house.
     

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  6. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

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    It looks like yours could be the one Eric is talking about. If I were you I would do an experiment and leave a few of your Daturas outside in the ground for the winter, some mulched and some not, to see for myself how they will do. I would keep one or two in the garage, though, as a backup, just in case . . .
     
  7. Miry

    Miry Member

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    Thanks for your input. I will try that this winter.
    Any ideas about how to control any pests on this plant? I never had any problems but someone else did.
     
  8. K Baron

    K Baron Well-Known Member

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    My Brugmansias are rife with aphids in the solarium, (removal by hand is best?) but with patience and time they are out of doors and the wasp and beetle family of insects are happy!
     
  9. Miry

    Miry Member

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    I did have aphids on nasturtiums last year. They got so bad that I had to pull the flowers out and destroy them. What can you use to get rid of them instead of picking them off as I saw way too many on these flowers?
     
  10. VongerV

    VongerV Member

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    Hello - Both pictures you posted are Brugmansia, not Datura. Some species or cultivars may survive a couple of degrees below freezing for a night or two without dying to the soil line. In general all above ground portions of Brugmansia will die back after being subjected to below freezing temperatures.

    If you were serious about trying to overwinter outside I would suggest two strategies:

    1) Plant the Brugmansia in ground and mulch heavily, 6 inches minimum. Assuming the plant survives it will slowly come up in late spring as the temperatures rise.
    2) Keep the pot as close to the house or any source of extra heat as possible, must be protected from rain. Will die to soil line, but may survive from roots.

    In both cases cross your fingers. In my opinion it is worth bringing them inside. You could put them in a frost free garage, basement or equivalent. Brugmansia indoors are susceptible to aphids, spider mites, fungus gnats etc. Best bet for aphids is to wash them off by hand or soap also works well. Good luck, Brugmansias are incredible and deserving of a home inside for the winter!! :)
     

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