Identification: Compare/contrast R. paludosa and R. xerimpelina

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by allelopath, Sep 4, 2006.

  1. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I am trying to determine whether some specimens are Russula paludosa or Russula xerampelina (Shrimp Russula). R. paludosa is listed not edible and R. xerampeIina is listed as edible (very much so). I had a local guy tell me that he collects and eats the Russula with the pinkish stalks and shrimp-like odor. Some of the specimens have a seafood like smell to them. All have a pinkish tint on the stems. In "Mushrooms of Colorado" it describes the stalks of R. paludosa as having "low longitudinal ridges" and those of R. xerimpelina as having a "grooved surface". I don't how to distinguish those.

    Most of the specimens have a cap color like the one on the left (darker red). I did one spore sprint of each cap color. The spore print color is the same, but I can't tell whether it is pale ochre (R. paludosa) or yellow to deep ochre orange (R. xerampelina). Even though I think the specimens are the same species, I am ready to throw out the handful of ones the brighter red cap based solely on the cap color.

    Can anyone suggest how I may determine the species of the darker ones?
     

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    Last edited: Sep 4, 2006
  2. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    Do you have a book that says what the spore prints are supposed to look like?

    It's amazing how fast the mushrooms can make a spore print, when covered in plastic or under a cover.
     
  3. allelopath

    allelopath Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    As I said, the spore print color (of the 2 specimens in the photo) is the same, but I can't tell whether it is pale ochre (R. paludosa) or yellow to deep ochre orange (R. xerampelina).

    Thanks for your reply, though. I seemed to have stumped everyone, unfortunately.
     
  4. silver_creek

    silver_creek Active Member

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    Did you do the nibble test? Shrimp russula, nibbled raw, does not taste bitter; many of the other red cap russulas do.
     
  5. M. D. Vaden

    M. D. Vaden Active Member 10 Years

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    I even read looking for a spore sentence, but missed it. My eyes seem to shift down a line sometimes.

    Well, we won't give up yet.
     
  6. miss_myxomycete

    miss_myxomycete Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi,
    Looking thru the very recent & excellent UK book : Mushrooms by Roger Philips, the most obvious difference between the 2 species appears to be that R.paludosa grows with conifers & R.xerampelina grows with broad leaved trees esp. beech & oak. The microscopic details of the spores & other features are all so similar unfortunately! However, BOTH are listed as edible!! Ingrid
     

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