clematis montana

Discussion in 'Vines and Climbers' started by nichelle, Jul 9, 2007.

  1. nichelle

    nichelle Active Member 10 Years

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    My mature clematis montana did not bloom this spring. It now has lots of new shoots and I'm wondering if they will bloom this year. If not, should they be pruned back (now, in the fall or next spring?)

    Generally, should the stems be pruned after blooming? I'm never too sure what to do with them, and they look pretty shabby all winter.

    Thanks for the help.
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Blooms on stems left from previous year, cutting back much will interfere with flowering. Dead stems and shabby stems will be covered by new growth made this summer. Others had difficulty with these dying back up there this past winter (there are many forms of this species, some apparently tender - or these particular specimens got too wet at the root in November), try searching forums for related discussion.
     
  3. nichelle

    nichelle Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks. Yes, I know lots of these vines suffered over the past winter. I just wasn't sure if they would flower later this summer on the new growth. Thanks for the information. I'll just leave the new stems and hope we don't have another extreme winter.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    It wasn't an extreme winter, 1990 was much colder (worst in 30 years). Down here some urban areas had upper teens F., not a deviation from normal patterns (average annual minimums 10-20F). Plants that froze did so from being tender, not from it being particularly cold - or actually got too wet instead of too cold.

    Normal bloom time for anemone clematis May-June, although a sprinkling on new growth may be possible.
     

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