Chanterelle late season flush?

Discussion in 'Fungi, Lichens and Slime Molds' started by Joel Bolete, Oct 11, 2012.

  1. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    I am hoping for a late season flush of chanterelle mushrooms.

    what do you think the chances are for that?
     
  2. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    p < 0.05.
     
  3. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    That doesnt sound good...

    'P' eats o.o5?

    or 'P' = percent chance or o.o5 that there will be a fall flush?

    or 'P' = percipitation amount for the next few days is o.o5mm?

    or 'P' is the acidic level of the soil and it needs to be o.o5 reading in order to make a fall flush?

    or maybe you found the wrong window and posted a random riddle to confuse us all...
     
  4. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    sorry, it was a statistics thing. I just came out of my statistics class and say your post.

    "p < 0.05" is short for "the probability is less than 5%", which, in statistics, is another way of saying that something is fairly unlikely to happen. Of course, it all depends on the weather where you are. Here, the late flush is really unlikely. Maybe conditions are better where you are? And hey, you never know.
     
  5. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    I am going to have to say p<100.0

    Good times, this is half of the haul, 18lbs in 45 minutes power picking.

    Loving the wet mild late season. Full buckets this weekend!
     

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  6. Fine ocean parker

    Fine ocean parker Active Member

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    oh my, that is quite the haul! I've never picked my own mushrooms but, am very interested. I live in white rock and am wondering if you can give me any tips\help on finding them? and what to look for? Any other thoughts would be appreciated.
    thanks.
     
  7. Mikuhrib

    Mikuhrib Member

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    Hi Joel,

    Are you finding these at lower elevations? I went to my spot on the
    North shore on Sunday but didn't find anything. Was finding lots there last year
    at this time.

    On a different note, vancouverites check out west 16th between granville
    And arbutus there are lots of Laetiporus sulfureous growing from the trees
    With the Purple leaves...nice to look at.
     
  8. MycoRob

    MycoRob Active Member

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    Well Joel - glad i was wrong! Good finds!
     
  9. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    Yeah I am glad you are too.

    I figured from previous experience that it aint over till the frost comes. Im going out again this saturday and I have 2 more patches to check.

    I really hope that it is a full as it was last monday.

    @Miki
    These were found at under 1000ft. the northshore was soooooooo dry this year I doubt anything will grow except boletes and honey mushrooms maybe the odd polypore. Also I saw frost on em that last time I crossed the IRonworkers bridge. made me know not to go back to Caplk/Grouse mountain. FYI - I jumped the fence at the grouse mountain gondola parking llot and crossed into the power lines above cap lake. It is prime chanterelle teritory if you can deal with the slope.

    even in the dry spell I found a few dry buttons, sulphur shelf and some honey's.

    Well worth the trek as it is so clean and pristine... 'no one jumps the fence.'
     
  10. Mikuhrib

    Mikuhrib Member

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    Thanks for the reply.. I don't think I'm gonna be jumping fences though
    I figured with the 100 days of heat followed by frost chances of anything coming up were pretty slim. Just lots of red belted polypores. Did u have more rain in your area or are u near spots
    That are damp year round?
     
  11. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Today I checked one of my regular Chanterelle areas in the North Shore Mountains. Most of the reliable spots are still not producing anything, but I did find a few scattered Chanterelles and one good cluster. My guess is that it will be next weekend before they are coming up in worthwhile numbers.
     
  12. cagreene

    cagreene Active Member

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    there are places on the west coast of Vancouver island in the port Renfrew area that used to produce tons of chantrels...unfortunately, too my people picking, and not CUTTING has left us with depleted stock year after year. my husband is a big cultivator of indoor mushrooms, and we are working on getting them to grow closer to home, as we have a alpine 'hill' some call a mountain here on salt spring, so its his new hobby. he has success getting the mycilium to form in lab conditions, but with the driest summer on record, we don't have much hopes for a crop this year.... love the picture, nice haul!!!(also nice to see you cut them,we have to remember to educate those wishing to harvest, before they are forever gone)
     
  13. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    Is it possible to harvest Chanterelle comercially? I mean back yard patch...
    I find the chantie to be so particular on its conditions that it would be hard to find the perfect spot for them to grow.

    I feel the reason not many people cut vs Pick is the fact that in order to cut properly you need to be slow and thorough, methodical in you aproach to not disturbing the sleeping mycelium under the moss blanket and shallow layer of soil/wood. One needs to take such deliberate care to expose the base, insert the blade and cut without damaging the forming buttons and tendrils of mushroom. In fact studies have been made that educate us to know that even cutting the mycelium can allow bacterial infections into the mycelium and stunt its growth or kill future growth. Its a real eye opener.

    I am absoultely not pointing out at anyone here, I am guilty of pulling and cutting and dropping. I am guilty of sometimes just pulling and cleaning once I arive home. Depends on circumstance.

    There are days where I am forced to power pick because of family and time restraint, weather or sunset. many reasons. But as a rule and guideline, to cut without pulling is a goal that we should all strive to achieve when picking these specie of mushroom.

    I do know that there are other specie which are much more resilient to the pulling method of picking. others are not so.

    It was a great haul!
     
  14. vitog

    vitog Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Re cutting vs pulling Chanterelles, it is a common misconception that it makes any difference. Keep in mind that the mushroom is just the fruiting part of the fungus; the real thing is the mycelium, which is entirely underground and not affected by what anyone does with the mushrooms that it produces. It's like the difference between pulling and cutting an apple off the tree.

    In fact, I've read reports of scientific studies that actually compared the productivity of pulling vs cutting, and they generally concluded that there was no difference or that the pulled patches were slightly more productive. Take a look at page 47 of this report: http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/gtr576.pdf .

    My own experience has been that pulling certainly does not hurt production. I've been going to the same areas of the North Shore for over 30 years and have always pulled mushrooms, cut off the dirty part of the stem base and then tossed that part into the bushes to hide the fact that mushrooms have been picked in that area. Those areas are producing better than ever lately, on average, with year to year differences due to weather.
     
  15. cagreene

    cagreene Active Member

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    i am sorry to doubt you, but i have witnessed the decimation of the chanterelle mushroom in the port renfrew area over the past 20 years. that which was picked this year, dies, almost every time, without fail. however, there have been some patches, that did come back, but i don't believe they grew from the same 'vein' of mycilium.
    with so many new 'pickers' out there, we have seen entire hills go bare after only 2 or three seasons of pickers, and not cutters... as mycilium spreads underground rather quickly, in the right conditions, you may have got them to come back, but i doubt they grew back from the original mycilium. my husband has been cultivating indoor/outdoor mushrooms for 17 years, multiple varieties, and once the mycilium of the chantrel is disturbed from puling, its game over. in port renfrew, the bedrock is so close to the surface, giving only inches in most areas for the mycilium to grow. i wonder if this was the reason why they did not survive being picked?
     
  16. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    The debate is on...

    I think to myself, if i was a deer and I wanted to eat a chanterelle mushroom they would both pull and cut (with teeth) but parts would be left and the mycelium would most definetely be disturbed.

    therefore in my hypothosis I concur that pulling and cutting is that SAME THING. dont dig up the ground and over pick. dont pick the tiny immature mushrooms. when they mature they drop spores...

    spores = mushrooms


    ***decimated <- you need to look into a dictionary. That would be complete annihilation and never to return. EVER kind of thing. I highly doubt you have the ability to determine such a thing. other elements are in play to reduce a crop or flowering bodies of mycelium. PH, water, sun, foliage, invasive specie, the most important is weather.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 5, 2012
  17. cagreene

    cagreene Active Member

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    when entire hillsides go bare, that once produced hundred of pounds since the local natives started to record their history, and are no more... yeah i call that DECIMATION! if you don't like what you read, i am sorry, but you can justify your bad manners until the cows come home,...won't change the truth.
     
  18. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    I am truly not looking to create a flame war here.

    Where does one find records into the findings of original native american history, particularily the resource declarations of generations? it sounds like a fasinating read, along with areas where one found the native bands and the practices of them while they picked so long before we settled into canada. also the weather patterns and duration of seasonal temeratures must have been part of these records. YOu must be a privilaged canadian to have access to such information.

    very interesting comment.
     
  19. Mikuhrib

    Mikuhrib Member

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    This discussion is getting a little heated, I personally would have to side with the somewhat scientific research provided in Vitog's link. Getting back to the original topic, has anyone else been going out and finding decent numbers of chanterelles in the past week? I went last Sunday back to the north shore and got about a pound and a few hedgehogs but was there for a long time. Still not quite it
     
  20. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    Yes! I have had great success this past five weeks. last Wednesday found 10 lbs, 2.5 hours. I am not a northshore picker though, I am a fraser valley, mission, golden ears picker. I dont know if there is a change in elevation that is too great. but this type of weather is really good for them, a little break int he wet and they should be firm and not soggy today.

    Full Buckets!
     
  21. cagreene

    cagreene Active Member

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    being of native heritage, and having a great grandmother, who was alive in the 1800's, before the area was trampled by whites, the local natives, as well as all the other tribes, pasted their history by word of mouth, passed down through the ages... including their hunting, and gathering places. many generations before her, they learned that by pulling the chanterelles they were killing them, and changed their practices. my great grandmother died at 104 years old, and was a wealth of local knowledge, being the princess of her tribe, she was privy to much information.
    duncan, sooke and port renfrew are still producing, as i was just there yesterday harvesting, sparse, but still in fruit.
     
  22. Joel Bolete

    Joel Bolete Active Member

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    Just yesterday (sunday) I was on a hike of 6km through south mission forest and took out 5gallons of chanterelles. worked out to about 20+ lbs. same area that I have been picking for the past 3 seasons. I have never seen as many, and as large mushrooms as I have this year.

    I think that the environmental conditions have allowed us such a late season and with such an abundance.

    I have been cutting 95% of my finds and doing so without disturbing any mycelium. it seems still to me that the way which I pick, is a bit arrogant in my perception of impact and the narcasistic of us to think that we can have such an insight of natural balance. I am not a native, nor have I a wealth of knowledge given down from naturalist to naturalist.

    However,

    Cagreene you are native and have had access to such a vault of understanding. I say that how would he we understand unless a man(or woman) tells us? it is called trickle down, the horses go in front of the cart. I am glad that we had this discussion for when light is cast into a room full of doubters the doubters will be forced to see the truth. You cannot argue with a heritage that was built upon the ultimate survivalist handbook. natives have a heritage that makes Bear Grylis look ike a panzy boy. with no disrespect meant, Natives of this nation were still in leather houses, migrating with annual food granted by nature when men in steel and leather floated across the Atlantic ocean in a wooden boats carying metalurgy and chemistry and 'sophistication' worldly education systems.

    The native story of heritage is the last true swan song of human culture. I honor that by beleiving what has been passed down, not with out modern conditions but with a respect that using these types of practices in a natural environment will certainly not hurt or take you out of balance with the entity they surived within for generations.
     
  23. cagreene

    cagreene Active Member

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    sorry to burst your bubble joel, but the natives here in canada were living in LONG houses, (look it up) long before those in europe left their hovels. a long house was the first 2-3 story apartment building EVER designed. when the first settlers arrived in new york area, they were amazed by the long houses, and took this building design back to Europe with them. further more, the canadian plains natives, NEVER lived in tee-pees, that is the southern american plains natives, ( and we are not indians) because they were nomadic and moved with the herds....
     
  24. woodschmoe

    woodschmoe Active Member 10 Years

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    Cagreene, there is simply no record of longhouses that were more than one story high. They were massive, but spread out on one big floor. Canadian First Nations of the plains did indeed live in tipis, this is well established and not in dispute. Longhouses were found on the coast, and amongst eastern groups. I'd also suggest that referring to early European dwellings as 'hovels' denigrates them, and I suspect that were one to refer to First Nations in their 'hovels' you would be (properly) offended.

    Now, on the topic at hand: terrible chanterelle year for me, I'm typically harvesting bags, and so far have found just one. Not one bag, but one stinkin' mushroom. I suspect the dry summer hereabouts was devastating.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2012
  25. cagreene

    cagreene Active Member

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    if you have never lived in one, how would you know? because you read it in some book written by a white man? i am sorry to be the one to inform you, but over 99% of what is written in the white mans account of native history is wrong. the Iroquois ( six nations) natives lived in multiple room, and floor long houses. west coast 1st nation natives had only 1 floor to their long houses...
     

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